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News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Board member in the News: David Sinclair receives NIH Directors High Risk, High Reward award

Oct 9
2017

Board member in the News: David Sinclair receives NIH Directors High Risk, High Reward award

On October 5, 2017, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund's High Risk, High Reward program announced that 2000 AFAR Research Grant recipient and current Board Member David Sinclair, PhD, has received its NIH Directors Pioneer Award for his project, Uncovering the Human Secretome. Dr. Sinclair is one of 12 Pioneer Awards. The High-Risk, High-Reward Research program, part of the NIH Common Fund, funds 86 awards to exceptionally creative scientists proposing to use highly innovative approaches to tackle major challenges in biomedical research. The program supports high-risk ideas with high-impact potential. The program accelerates scientific discovery by supporting high-risk research proposals that may…


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Awardee in News: Dongsheng Cai's research on hypothalamus stem cells in R&D magazine

Oct 3
2017

Awardee in News: Dongsheng Cai's research on hypothalamus stem cells in R&D magazine

On September 29, 2017, R&D magazine reported on research by 2017 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star in Aging Research Award recipient Dongsheng Cai, MD, PhD linking the stem cells in the hypothalamus and aging. The article, Stem Cells Could be Key to Extending Lifespan, explains Dr. Cai’s discovery that stem cells in the brain’s hypothalamus govern how fast aging occurs in the body, which could result in new strategies for warding off age-related diseases and extending lifespan. As Dr. Cai notes: “Our research shows that the number of hypothalamic neural stem cells naturally declines over the life…


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Board Member in the News:  Steven Austad on Longevity Disparity in America in Forbes

Sep 27
2017

Board Member in the News: Steven Austad on Longevity Disparity in America in Forbes

On September 26, 2017, PBS Next Avenue column on Forbes.com featured insights from AFAR Scientific Director Steven N. Austad, PhD, on research that points towards how socioeconomic differences influence disparites in longevity and healthspan for Americans. The article,  “Why America’s Inequality is a Threat to Living Longer,” captured the discussion shared at Stanford University 10th Anniversary Symposium: Celebrating a Decade of Resigning Long Life, where Dr. Austad presented. Dr. Austad references research showing a gap between the haves and have-nots in health now threatens to undermine the progress science has made in lengthening human expectancy —68.2…


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Grantee in the News: David Holtzman on triple impact of ApoE4 in Nature.

Sep 22
2017

Grantee in the News: David Holtzman on triple impact of ApoE4 in Nature.

On September 20, 2017, Nature published research by 1995 Beeson Scholar David Holtzman, M.D. on two additional ways that the genetic variant ApoE4 impacts neourodeneration linked to Alzheimer’s Disease. ApoE4 has long been understood to be a gentic risk factor for speeding up the development of brain plaques associated with Alzheimer’s. In “ApoE4 markedly exacerbates tau-mediated neurodegeneration in a mouse model of tauopathy,” Holtzman and his co-authors discovered that ApoE4 also worsens tau tangles—another signature of the disease—as well as increases inflammation that kills brain cells. This triple impact of ApoE4 discovered…


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Grantee in the News: Catherine Kaczorowski receives $5.4m NIA grant

Sep 22
2017

Grantee in the News: Catherine Kaczorowski receives $5.4m NIA grant

On September 18, 2017, the Jackson Laboratory (JAX) announced that AFAR 2014 New Investigator Award in Alzheimer's Disease recipient Catherine Kaczorowski has received a five year, $5.4 million grant from the National Institute on Aging to study cognitive resilience to Alzheimer’s disease. As the Jackson Laboratory reports: The grant will fund research to explore why some people with a family history of Alzheimer’s disease, and even brain changes associated with the disease, nevertheless manage to maintain their cognitive capabilities. Understanding the genetic factors behind this so-called cognitive resilience could provide targets for treatment and prevention of Alzheimer&rsquo…


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