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News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Grantee in the News: Kristine Yaffe in WebMD on dementia risk factors

Jun 5
2018

Grantee in the News: Kristine Yaffe in WebMD on dementia risk factors

On May 30, 2018, WebMD highlighted the research and insights of 2001 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging Scholar recipient Kristine Yaffe, M.D. In “Risk Factors That Put You on The Road to Dementia,” Dr. Yaffe lends her insights on multiple dementia risk factors. “It’s not yet definitive, but in the past 5 years, we’ve made progress on identifying modifiable risk factors for which the evidence is pretty strong,” Dr. Yaffe states. The article spotlights Dr. Yaffe’s co-authored research in JAMA Neurology on mild head injuries and the increased…


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Grantee in the News: Reisa Sperling in Reader’s Digest on early signs of Alzheimer’s disease and the A4 study

Jun 4
2018

Grantee in the News: Reisa Sperling in Reader’s Digest on early signs of Alzheimer’s disease and the A4 study

On May 29, 2018, Reader’s Digest spotlighted the insights and research of 2003 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leader Career Development Award in Aging recipient Reisa Sperling M.D., M.M.Sc. “10 Early Signs of Alzheimer’s Every Adult Should Know” highlights a new clinical trial on Alzheimer’s disease led by Dr. Sperling. The A4 study "will evaluate patients with evidence of Alzheimer’s damage in the brain but who still have normal thinking and memory function. The trial will randomly assign groups to receive medication, and researchers will determine over three years whether the drugs…


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Grantee in the News: Jerome Mertens’ research in Cell Reports and PsychCentral on mitochondrial dysfunction and age-related diseases

Jun 1
2018

Grantee in the News: Jerome Mertens’ research in Cell Reports and PsychCentral on mitochondrial dysfunction and age-related diseases

On May, 29, 2018, Cell Reports published research co-authored by 2015 Irene Diamond Fund/AFAR Postdoctoral Transition Award in Aging recipient Jerome Mertens, Ph.D. “Mitochondrial Aging Defects Emerge in Directly Reprogrammed Human Neurons due to Their Metabolic Profile” concludes “that iNs are a valuable tool for studying mitochondrial aging and support a bioenergetic explanation for the high susceptibility of the brain to aging.” The research was also picked up by PsychCentral, where Dr. Mertens notes the difference in the mitochondria of older donors: “Pretty much every area we looked at — functional, genetic, and morphological — had…


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Grantee in the News: Adam Antebi’s research published in Trends in Cell Biology and The New York Times on the role of the nucleolus on lifespan

May 31
2018

Grantee in the News: Adam Antebi’s research published in Trends in Cell Biology and The New York Times on the role of the nucleolus on lifespan

On May 17, 2018, Trends in Cell Biology published research co-authored by 2005 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award recipient Adam Antebi, Ph.D.  “Nucleolar Function in Lifespan Regulation” focuses on the evolving understanding of the role of nucleolar function. The research team concludes that “recent evidence has highlighted novel roles of the nucleolus in major physiological functions including stress response, development, and aging.” The research was also picked up by The New York Times, where Dr. Antebi states: “We think the nucleolus plays an important role in regulating the [lifespan] of animals.”  Read…


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Grantee in the News: Reisa Sperling’s research published in JAMA Neurology on vascular risk and cognitive decline

May 30
2018

Grantee in the News: Reisa Sperling’s research published in JAMA Neurology on vascular risk and cognitive decline

On May 21, 2018, JAMA Neurology published research co-authored by 2003 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leader Career Development Award in Aging recipient Reisa Sperling M.D., M.M.Sc. “Interactive Associations of Vascular Risk and β-Amyloid Burden with Cognitive Decline in Clinically Normal Elderly Individuals” presents findings from a longitudinal observational study that examined clinically normal older adults in the Harvard Aging Brain Study. The researchers found that “vascular risk has a potent association with longitudinal cognitive decline, both alone and synergistically with Aβ burden in clinically normal older adults.” The research was picked up by ScienceDaily,…


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