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News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Grantees in the News: Gil Atzmon, Nir Barzilai, and Thomas Perls on genetics and Longevity in Journals of Gerontology

Jul 24
2017

Grantees in the News: Gil Atzmon, Nir Barzilai, and Thomas Perls on genetics and Longevity in Journals of Gerontology

On July 18, 2017, The Journals of Gerontology published research co-authored by 2011 AFAR Research Grant recipient Gil Atzmon, PhD, 1997 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging scholar, 1994 AFAR Research Grant recipient, and AFAR Deputy Scientific Director Nir Barzilai, MD, and 1998 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging scholar Thomas T. Perls, MD, MPH, FACP on the role FOXO3 plays in longevity. The study, Effects of FOXO3 Polymorphisms on Survival to Extreme Longevity in Four Centenarian Studies, examined genetic data from blood samples of 2,072 adults, ages ranging from 96 to 119 years, from four centenarian studies. The researchers found…


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Grantees in the News: Leora Horwitz, Harlan Krumholz, and Joseph Ross on hospital readmissions and mortality risk in NPR.org

Jul 24
2017

Grantees in the News: Leora Horwitz, Harlan Krumholz, and Joseph Ross on hospital readmissions and mortality risk in NPR.org

On July 18, 2017, NPR.org featured research by 2010 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging scholar Leora I. Horwitz, MD, MHS, 1996 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging scholar Harlan M. Krumholz, MD, SM, and 2008 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging scholar Joseph S. Ross, MD, MHS on how reducing hospital readmissions don’t increase risk of death. The article, Pushing Hospitals To Reduce Readmissions Hasn't Increased Deaths, is written by Dr. Krumholz and fellow researcher Kumar Dharmarajan on their research originally published in the Journal of the American…


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Grantee in the News: Rose-Anne Kenny and Matthew D. L. O’Connell on the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial in JAMA

Jul 20
2017

Grantee in the News: Rose-Anne Kenny and Matthew D. L. O’Connell on the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial in JAMA

On July 17, 2017, The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published research from 1998 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging scholar Rose-Anne Kenny, MD and 2015 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging CARDI scholar Matthew D. L. O’Connell, PhD on their Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT). The study, Injurious Falls and Syncope in Older Community-Dwelling Adults Meeting Inclusion Criteria for SPRINT, compared adults with hypertension aged 75 years or older participating in The Irish Longitudinal Study on Aging (TILDA) with the control arm of SPRINT. SPRINT treated older adults with an aggressive…


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Grantee in the News: David Holtzman on sleep and Alzheimer’s disease in WorldHealth.net

Jul 20
2017

Grantee in the News: David Holtzman on sleep and Alzheimer’s disease in WorldHealth.net

On July 12, 2017, WorldHealth.net featured research co-authored by 1995 The Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging scholar David M. Holtzman, MD on the link between sleep quality and Alzheimer’s disease. Originally published in the Brain Journal, the study, Slow wave sleep disruption increases cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β levels, observed 17 adults between ages 35 and 65. These participants wore activity monitors on their wrists and electrodes along their scalp for brain wave monitoring. Half of the participants listened to beeps in their headphones to disrupt their quality of sleep. The researchers found that the adults who had disrupted…


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Grantee in the News: Bruce Troen on high-intensity interval training reduces frailty in older mice in NY Times

Jul 19
2017

Grantee in the News: Bruce Troen on high-intensity interval training reduces frailty in older mice in NY Times

On July 12, 2017, The New York Times featured research by 1990 AFAR Research Grant recipient, Bruce R. Troen, MD in an article, High-Intensity Workouts May Be Good at Any Age. The Times’ piece spotlights a study co-authored by Dr. Troen in The Journals of Gerontology. The original study, High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) improves physical performance and frailty in aged mice, observed sedentary mice that were the rodent equivalent of about age 65 in humans. These mice were administered 10-minute uphill treadmill HIIT sessions three times per week over 16 weeks. The researchers found that muscles from these mice had greater mass, larger…


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