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News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Grantee in the News: Nathan LaBrasseur's research linking biology of aging to deadly lung disease

Feb 27
2017

Grantee in the News: Nathan LaBrasseur's research linking biology of aging to deadly lung disease

Nature Communications recently published research co-authored by 2012 Glenn/AFAR Scholarships for Research in the Biology of Aging recipient Nathan K. LaBrasseur, MS, PhD, which links the biology of aging with the deadly, yet little understood, lung disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. As a related article in Science Daily reports: A Mayo Clinic study has shown evidence linking the biology of aging with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a disease that impairs lung function and causes shortness of breath, fatigue, declining quality of life, and, ultimately, death. Researchers believe that these findings, which appear in Nature Communications, are the next step toward a possible…


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Grantee in the News: MSTAR Marc Weinberg research on muscle mass and chemotherapy

Feb 27
2017

Grantee in the News: MSTAR Marc Weinberg research on muscle mass and chemotherapy

Health Medicine Network recently reported on research published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research co-authored by 2015 Medical Student Training in Aging Research (MSTAR) scholar Marc Weinberg that explores if muscle composition could be a predictor of chemotherapy side effects. As Health Medicine Network reports: Researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center report in the journal Clinical Cancer Research that a tool developed at UNC could potentially help doctors better identify patients at high risk for toxic side effects that could require hospitalizations. Shlomit Strulov Shachar, MD, the study’s first author, said they found that…


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Experts in the News: Six AFAR researchers lend insights to TIME magazine 2017 Longevity issue

Feb 24
2017

Experts in the News: Six AFAR researchers lend insights to TIME magazine 2017 Longevity issue

The February 16, 2017 “Longevity” issue of TIME magazine spotlighted several AFAR experts in features stories. “How Silicon Valley Is Trying to Hack Its Way into Longevity” explored super-pills to target aging and featured 2015 Irving S. Wright Award of Distinction winner Leonard Guarente, PhD and his work with Elysium Health. The ProLon five-day, ultra-low calerie meal kit developed by 2013 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star Award in Aging Research winner Valter Longo, PhD is also highlighted. 2016 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award recipient Rozalyn Anderson, PhD, also comments on caloric restriction. In “Do Cranky People Really Die Younger…


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Grantees in News: Hansen and Kumsta on heat stress and autophagy in Nature and Science

Feb 23
2017

Grantees in News: Hansen and Kumsta on heat stress and autophagy in Nature and Science

On February 15, 2017, Nature Communications published research led by 2014 Julie Martin Mid-Career Award in Aging Research recipient Malene Hanson, PhD with 2013 Ellison Medical Foundation/AFAR Postdoctoral Fellows in Aging Research Program recipient Caroline Kumsta, PhD. In “Hormetic heat stress and HSF-1 induce autophagy to improve survival and proteostasis in C. elegans,” Hansen and Kumsta looked at the effect of heat on cellular stress of the C. elegans worm. Their findings demonstrate that the cellular process of autophagy contributes to stress resistance. In a related article in Science Magazine, “What doesn’t kill you makes your stronger,”…


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Grantee in the News:  Donovan Maust in NY Times on rise of older adults using multiple psychotropics

Feb 23
2017

Grantee in the News: Donovan Maust in NY Times on rise of older adults using multiple psychotropics

A February 13, 2017 article in The New York Times highlighted research led by 2014 Beeson Scholar Donovan T. Maust, MD. In “Sharp Rise Reported in Older Americans’ Use of Multiple Psychotropic Drugs,” the Times notes: The research team, led by Dr. Donovan T. Maust of the University of Michigan and Dr. Mark Olfson of Columbia University, analyzed data from annual government surveys of office-based doctors. The team focused on office visits by people 65 or older that resulted in the prescribing of at least three of a list of psychiatric, sleep and pain medications like Valium, Prozac, OxyContin and Ambien.…


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