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The latest updates from AFAR.

AFAR in the News: Scientific Director Steven Austad and multi-AFAR grantee Brian Kennedy on Metformin and Rapamycin in True Viral News

Apr 24
2017

AFAR in the News: Scientific Director Steven Austad and multi-AFAR grantee Brian Kennedy on Metformin and Rapamycin in True Viral News

On March 29, 2017, True Viral News featured insights from AFAR Scientific Director Steven Austad, PhD, and 2009 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star Award in Aging Research, 2003 AFAR Research Award, and 2008 Julie Martin Mid-Career Award in Aging Research recipient, Brian K. Kennedy, PhD on metformin and rapamycin. The article, Could a Pill Put the Breaks on Aging?, takes an in-depth look at two drugs with potential to increase human healthspan: metformin and rapamycin. The subject of the AFAR-managed Targeting Aging with Metformin (TAME) Trial, metformin is the most common drug prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. The drug is also believed to encourage cell mitochondria…


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Grantee Spotlight Interview: Jennifer L. Garrison, PhD

Apr 24
2017

Grantee Spotlight Interview: Jennifer L. Garrison, PhD

AFAR’s grant programs in the biology of aging are central to our mission to support and advance healthy aging through biomedical research. At leading institutions nationwide, our grantees hard work, ingenuity, and leadership are advancing cutting-edge research that will help us all live healthier, longer. In this Grantee Spotlight interview, 2016 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty recipient, Jennifer Garrison, PhD shares what inspired her to enter the field of aging research and what impact she hopes her research will make thanks to AFAR’s support. Read Dr. Garrison’s Grantee Spotlight Interview here.


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Grantee in the News: Ian Lanza on how interval exercise improves muscle cells, in Cell Metabolism

Apr 20
2017

Grantee in the News: Ian Lanza on how interval exercise improves muscle cells, in Cell Metabolism

On March 7, 2017, Cell Metabolism published research co-authored by 2011 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty recipient, Ian R. Lanza, PhD on how interval exercise strengthens and increases cell mitochondria previously reduced and weakened from aging. The researchers took baseline measurements for aerobic fitness, blood-sugar levels, gene activity, and mitochondrial health of the muscle cells of 72 sedentary participants, broken into two groups. One group was comprised of individuals aged 30 years or younger, and the other was comprised of individuals older than 64 years of age. The participants were assigned either to weight training, interval exercise, moderate aerobic exercise with light weight training, or…


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Board Member in the News: Scientific Director Steven Austad on high-risk factors for heart disease linked to later-in-life Alzheimer’s disease in HealthDay

Apr 18
2017

Board Member in the News: Scientific Director Steven Austad on high-risk factors for heart disease linked to later-in-life Alzheimer’s disease in HealthDay

On April 11, 2017, HealthDay News featured insights from AFAR’s Scientific Director Steven Austad, PhD on a study revealing middle-aged people who were high-risk for heart disease were more likely to have elevated brain amyloid deposition (proteins associated with Alzheimer’s disease) decades later. The article, A Healthy Middle-Aged Heart May Protect Your Brain Later, describes a study that examined heart health data from nearly 350 participants, around 52 years of age, and followed-up using brain scans about 25 years later. None of these participants started the study with dementia, but the follow-ups found that a participant with two or more risk…


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Grantee in the News: S. Duke Han on brain differences and risk of financial exploitation in HealthDay

Apr 18
2017

Grantee in the News: S. Duke Han on brain differences and risk of financial exploitation in HealthDay

On April 13, 2017, HealthDay News featured insights from 2012 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging winner, S. Duke Han, PhD in an article on how brain impairments in older adults may impact their vulnerability to financial exploitation. The article, Seniors' Brain Changes Could Make Them Vulnerable to Scams, explains research that compared the brains of two groups of 13 older adults who were exposed to exploitative schemes. One group had been financially-manipulated, and the other group had recognized and avoided the scams. Forty-five behavioral tests were performed on both groups to measure aspects such as memory, personality, financial reasoning,…


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