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Grantee in the News: Matt Kaeberlein’s Research and recent Webinar on The Dog Aging Project spotlighted in Healthday

May 21
2018

Grantee in the News: Matt Kaeberlein’s Research and recent Webinar on The Dog Aging Project spotlighted in Healthday View MoreBACK

On May 15, 2018, Healthday spotlighted 2007 Glenn Foundation for Medical Research Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award recipient Matt Kaeberlein, Ph.D., citing insights he presented during the recent Webinar, “The Dog Aging Project: Learning from Man’s Best Friend,” co-hosted by the Nathan Shock Centers Coordinating Center and the University of Washington Medicine Nathan Shock Center.


Can fido fetch the fountain of youth?” focuses on the Dog Aging Project, which is safely studying canine longevity in order to better understand human healthspan. The article explains “The Dog Aging Project is looking at a drug known as rapamycin, which is already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in people with cancer or who've had organ transplants.”

Matt Kaeberlein explains the potential effect this research could have on human longevity and healthspan. “It's complete speculation, but with something like rapamycin, we might get 10 to 15, maybe as much as 20 years. And in most people, they would be healthy additional years."

The article was also picked up by Health, WebMD, and Medical Xpress.

Read the full article here

Watch recording of the webinar here.


Matt Kaeberlein, Ph.D. is a Co-Director of the University of Washington Medicine Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging, for which AFAR serves as the Nathan Shock Centers Coordinating Center.
Dr. Kaeberlein is also Director of the University of Washington Healthy Aging and Longevity Research Institute.





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