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News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Grantee in the News: Beeson Scholar & Chair Thomas M. Gill on hospice admission in JAGS and Futurity

Sep 18
2017

Grantee in the News: Beeson Scholar & Chair Thomas M. Gill on hospice admission in JAGS and Futurity

  On September 12, 2017, the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society published research co-authored by 1997 Beeson Scholar and current Beeson Program Advisory Committee Chair Thomas M. Gill, MD evaluating the relationship between the presence and number of restricting symptoms and number of disabilities and subsequent admission to hospice at the end of life. In “Distressing Symptoms, Disability, and Hospice Services at the End of Life: Prospective Cohort Study,” Gill and his co-authors found that hospice services appear to be suitably targeted to older persons with the greatest needs at the end of life, although the short duration of…


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Board member in the News: James Kirkland’s research on screening platform for senolytics in Nature

Sep 18
2017

Board member in the News: James Kirkland’s research on screening platform for senolytics in Nature

On September 4, 2017, Nature Communications published research co-authored by 2012 Glenn/AFAR BIG Award winner and AFAR Board President-Elect James L. Kirkland, MD, PhD, on the use of a screening platform to identify more senolytic drugs. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-00314-z As reported in “Identification of HSP90 inhibitors as a novel class of senolytics,” Kirkland and his co-authors “established a senescence associated β-galactosidase assay as a screening platform to rapidly identify drugs that specifically affect senescent cells”…”to identify novel and more optimal senotherapeutic drugs and combinations.” Senolytic or senotherapeutic…


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Board member in the News: Today Show spotlights Nir Barzilai and the TAME Trial

Sep 14
2017

Board member in the News: Today Show spotlights Nir Barzilai and the TAME Trial

On Friday, September 8, 2017, NBC Today Show featured a segment with correspondent Maria Shriver spotlighting AFAR Deputy Scientific Director and multiple grantee Nir Barzilai, MD on the potential of the TAME (Targeting Aging with Metformin) Trial . Shot at Dr. Barzilai’s lab at Einstein College of Medicine, the segment explores the potential for drugs that target aging, like Metformin, to extend healthspan. Their dialogue stresses if the FDA considers aging an indication for such interventions, many more promising drugs are ready to be tested and brought to the market, transforming how we can all live healthier as we grow older. …


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Board Member in the News: David Sinclair on Senolytics in The Boston Herald

Sep 12
2017

Board Member in the News: David Sinclair on Senolytics in The Boston Herald

A September 9, 2017 story in The Boston Herald featured insights by 2000 AFAR Research Grant recipient and Board member David Sinclair, PhD on the potential of senolytic drugs to transform how we age. Despite the article’s claims of “eternal youth” promised by “anti-aging therapies,” Dr. Sinclair speaks on the evidence-based science recently published by 2012 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology Award recipient and President-elect James L. Kirkland, MD, PhD in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society article The Clinical Potential of Senolytic Drugs. Dr. Sinclair notes: “I see a future where people will go…


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Grantee in the News: David Walker on Mitochondria and longevity in Nature Communications

Sep 7
2017

Grantee in the News: David Walker on Mitochondria and longevity in Nature Communications

On September 6, 2017, Nature Communications published research by 2009 AFAR Research Grant recipient and 2015 Julie Martin Mid-career Awards in Aging Research recipient David W. Walker, PhD. The study, Promoting Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission in midlife prolongs healthy lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster, involved breaking up enlarged and damaged mitochondria of fruit flies into smaller pieces by increasing their levels of the Drp1 protein. The researchers found the flies became more active and energetic and had more endurance. They also found that female flies lived 20% longer than their typical lifespan, while males lived 12% longer, on average. The research highlights the importance of the protein…


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