News
News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Grantee in the News: Adam Antebi’s research published in Trends in Cell Biology and The New York Times on the role of the nucleolus on lifespan

May 31
2018

Grantee in the News: Adam Antebi’s research published in Trends in Cell Biology and The New York Times on the role of the nucleolus on lifespan

On May 17, 2018, Trends in Cell Biology published research co-authored by 2005 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award recipient Adam Antebi, Ph.D.  “Nucleolar Function in Lifespan Regulation” focuses on the evolving understanding of the role of nucleolar function. The research team concludes that “recent evidence has highlighted novel roles of the nucleolus in major physiological functions including stress response, development, and aging.” The research was also picked up by The New York Times, where Dr. Antebi states: “We think the nucleolus plays an important role in regulating the [lifespan] of animals.”  Read…


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Grantee in the News: Reisa Sperling’s research published in JAMA Neurology on vascular risk and cognitive decline

May 30
2018

Grantee in the News: Reisa Sperling’s research published in JAMA Neurology on vascular risk and cognitive decline

On May 21, 2018, JAMA Neurology published research co-authored by 2003 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leader Career Development Award in Aging recipient Reisa Sperling M.D., M.M.Sc. “Interactive Associations of Vascular Risk and β-Amyloid Burden with Cognitive Decline in Clinically Normal Elderly Individuals” presents findings from a longitudinal observational study that examined clinically normal older adults in the Harvard Aging Brain Study. The researchers found that “vascular risk has a potent association with longitudinal cognitive decline, both alone and synergistically with Aβ burden in clinically normal older adults.” The research was picked up by ScienceDaily,…


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Board Members in the News: S. Jay Olshansky and John W. Rowe co-author article in The Hill on the impact of low US birth rate on older Americans

May 25
2018

Board Members in the News: S. Jay Olshansky and John W. Rowe co-author article in The Hill on the impact of low US birth rate on older Americans

On May 21, 2018, The Hill published an article co-authored by AFAR board member, S. Jay Olshansky, Ph.D. and former board president John W. Rowe, M.D. “Effects of historically low birth rate will reverberate for years to come” focuses on the economic and social consequences of a historically low birth rate in the United States.  The authors consider how the future of Social Security and Medicare, which depends on the taxes on the workforce, will be threatened if there is less taxable income due to lower birth rates. Job re-training and offering flexible work arrangements for older…


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AFAR Experts in the News: Nir Barzilai, Leonard Guarente, James L. Kirkland, S. Jay Olshansky, Thomas T. Perls, and David A. Sinclair in The Boston Globe on innovative aging research

May 24
2018

AFAR Experts in the News: Nir Barzilai, Leonard Guarente, James L. Kirkland, S. Jay Olshansky, Thomas T. Perls, and David A. Sinclair in The Boston Globe on innovative aging research

On May 19, 2018, The Boston Globe spotlighted several AFAR experts in a feature exploring the range of research approaches to increasing longevity and healthspan. The article, “Scientists in Mass. and beyond are working to slow the aging process,” features: • AFAR Deputy Scientific Director, 1997 Beeson Scholar and 1994 AFAR Research Grant recipient, Nir Barzilai, M.D. • 2015 Irving S. Wright Award of Distinction winner Leonard Guarente, Ph.D. • 2012 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology Award recipient and President-elect James L. Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D. •  AFAR Board member S. Jay Olshansky, Ph.D. •  1998 Beeson Scholar Thomas…


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Board Member in the News: James L. Kirkland’s research on cellular senescence highlighted in Healio

May 23
2018

Board Member in the News: James L. Kirkland’s research on cellular senescence highlighted in Healio

On May 19, 2018, Healio highlighted the research of AFAR President-elect and 2012 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology Award recipient James L. Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D. “Metabolic bone disease researcher receives Frontiers in Science Award” focuses on Sundeep Khosla, M.D., who was awarded the Frontiers in Science Award by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Dr. Khosla acknowledges how “my collaborations with James L. Kirkland, M.D., Ph.D., an investigator in aging biology at Mayo, showing that cellular senescence played a key role in causing age-related bone loss in mice and likely also in humans” have…


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Grantee in the News: Louis Lapierre’s research on autophagy in Cell Reports, Futurity, and more.

May 22
2018

Grantee in the News: Louis Lapierre’s research on autophagy in Cell Reports, Futurity, and more.

On May 15, 2018, Cell Reports published research co-authored by 2015 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty Louis Lapierre, Ph.D. In “Nuclear Export Inhibition Enhances HLH-30/TFEB Activity, Autophagy, and Lifespan,” the team found that “altering the nuclear export of HLH-30/TFEB can regulate autophagy and establishes the rationale of targeting XPO1 to stimulate autophagy in order to prevent neurodegeneration.” The research has been picked up by several publications, including by Futurity, where Dr. Lapierre states: “We and others think that by learning how to influence this process pharmacologically, we might be able to affect the progression…


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Grantee in the News: Domenico Praticò’s research on tau pathology and metabolic risk factor for neurodegenerative disease in Nature’s Molecular Psychiatry

May 22
2018

Grantee in the News: Domenico Praticò’s research on tau pathology and metabolic risk factor for neurodegenerative disease in Nature’s Molecular Psychiatry

On May 4, 2018, Nature’s Molecular Psychiatry published research co-authored by 1997 AFAR Research Grant and 1999 AFAR/Pfizer Innovations in Aging Research Award recipient Domenico Praticò, M.D. In “Elevated levels of brain homocysteine directly modulate the pathological phenotype of a mouse model of tauopathy,” Dr. Praticò and his peer authors found that “our findings support the novel concept that high Hcy level in the central nervous system is a metabolic risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases, specifically characterized by the progressive accumulation of tau pathology, namely tauopathies.” The research is available by subscription-only here, but…


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“Ask the Expert” Interview: Thomas Rando, M.D., Ph.D. on young blood, biomarkers, and aging

May 21
2018

“Ask the Expert” Interview: Thomas Rando, M.D., Ph.D. on young blood, biomarkers, and aging

AFAR is excited to announce the latest addition to our “Ask the Expert” series. In an exclusive interview, AFAR Board member Thomas Rando, M.D., Ph.D., of the Stanford University School of Medicine and the Stanford Longevity Center, weighs in on young blood, biomarkers, and aging. Read Dr. Rando’s “Ask the Expert” interview on our InfoAging site here. This interview also appears on NextAvenue.org as part of an editorial partnership between AFAR and Next Avenue, public media’s first and only national journalism service for America’s booming 50+ population, delivering…


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Grantee in the News: Matt Kaeberlein’s Research and recent Webinar on The Dog Aging Project spotlighted in Healthday

May 21
2018

Grantee in the News: Matt Kaeberlein’s Research and recent Webinar on The Dog Aging Project spotlighted in Healthday

On May 15, 2018, Healthday spotlighted 2007 Glenn Foundation for Medical Research Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award recipient Matt Kaeberlein, Ph.D., citing insights he presented during the recent Webinar, “The Dog Aging Project: Learning from Man’s Best Friend,” co-hosted by the Nathan Shock Centers Coordinating Center and the University of Washington Medicine Nathan Shock Center. “Can fido fetch the fountain of youth?” focuses on the Dog Aging Project, which is safely studying canine longevity in order to better understand human healthspan. The article explains “The Dog Aging Project is looking at a drug known as…


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Grantee in the News: Malaz Boustani in ScienceNewsline on Agile Implementation

May 18
2018

Grantee in the News: Malaz Boustani in ScienceNewsline on Agile Implementation

On May 9, 2018, ScienceNewsline spotlighted research by 2005 Paul Beeson Career Development Awards in Aging Research awardee and 2000 Center of Excellence Fellow Malaz Boustani, M.D., M.P.H. “Agile Implementation: Reengineering Dissemination of Healthcare in the US” explores recent research co-authored by Dr. Boustani published recently in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The research, ScienceNewsline notes, addresses “the escalating need for faster implementation of healthcare innovation. The authors present Agile Implementation, a simple new methodology which they designed, developed, embedded and tested. Agile Implementation enables fast, efficient, scalable, sustainable and effective dissemination of evidence-based healthcare solutions.…


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Grantee in the News: Catherine Kaczorowski appointed new Endowed Chair in Alzheimer’s Research at the Jackson Laboratory

May 17
2018

Grantee in the News: Catherine Kaczorowski appointed new Endowed Chair in Alzheimer’s Research at the Jackson Laboratory

AFAR congratulates 2014 New Investigator Award in Alzheimer's Disease recipient and 2017 Glenn/AFAR Postdoctoral Fellowship Program for Translational Research on Aging Selection Committee Catherine Kaczorowski, Ph.D. on being appointed as the new Evnin Family Endowed Chair in Alzheimer’s Research at the Jackson Laboratory (JAX), where she has served as an Associate Professor. The endowed chair is funded in part between Judith and Anthony Evnin, Ph.D. and a match from JAX’s board of trustees. Kaczorowski’s lab uses JAX’s unique mouse models to identify the protective factors that determine whether Alzheimer&rsquo…


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Board Member in the News:  Richard G.A. Faragher featured in SingularityHub on rejuvenation of senescent cells with resveralogues

May 16
2018

Board Member in the News: Richard G.A. Faragher featured in SingularityHub on rejuvenation of senescent cells with resveralogues

On May 3, 2018, SingularityHub featured research by AFAR Board Member Richard G.A. Faragher, Ph.D. In “Is the Secret to Significantly Longer Life Hidden in Our Cells?,” Dr. Faragher’s research on resveralogues and senescent cells is highlighted. The article notes: “What Faragher and his colleagues demonstrated in a paper published in BMC Cell Biology last year was that resveralogues, chemicals based on resveratrol, were able to reactivate a protein called a splicing factor that is involved in gene regulation. Within hours, the chemicals caused the cells to rejuvenate and start dividing like younger cells.” …


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Watch a Recording of the Dog Aging Project Webinar

May 14
2018

Watch a Recording of the Dog Aging Project Webinar

On May 11th 2018, the Nathan Shock Centers Coordinating Center and the University of Washington Medicine Nathan Shock Center co-hosted a webinar, The Dog Aging Project: Learning from Man’s Best Friend. 2007 Glenn Foundation for Medical Research Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award recipient and Co-Director of the Dog Aging Project Matt Kaeberlein, Ph.D. presented the latest findings from this innovative approach to understanding human aging by studying canine longevity. Steven N. Austad, Ph.D. (Co-Principal Investigator of the Nathan Shock Center Coordinating Center, Director of the NSC at the University of Alabama Birmingham, and AFAR Scientific Director) facilitated at…


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AFAR in the News: Nir Barzilai, Stephanie Lederman, and S. Jay Olshansky in Aging and Disease journal on why aging health should be in the WHO Work Program

May 14
2018

AFAR in the News: Nir Barzilai, Stephanie Lederman, and S. Jay Olshansky in Aging and Disease journal on why aging health should be in the WHO Work Program

In the April 2018 Issue, Aging and Disease published an editorial co-authored by AFAR Deputy Scientific Director, 1997 Beeson Scholar and 1994 AFAR Research Grant recipient, Nir Barzilai, M.D.; AFAR Executive Director Stephanie Lederman, Ed.M.; and AFAR Board member S. Jay Olshansky, Ph.D. “Aging Health and R & D for Healthy Longevity Must Be Included into the WHO Work Program” highlights the urgency of the public health issues of aging populations and how the public health issue will increase as life expectancy increases.  Based on these statistics, the authors argue that aging health should be included in…


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Grantees in the News: Judith Campisi and Ana Maria Cuervo elected to esteemed scientific academies

May 10
2018

Grantees in the News: Judith Campisi and Ana Maria Cuervo elected to esteemed scientific academies

AFAR is pleased to share the news that two of our experts have been elected to esteemed scientific academies: • 1990 Glenn Foundation for Medical Research and AFAR Grant for Junior Faculty Judith Campisi, Ph.D. has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, and 2008 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star Award in Aging Research and 2000 Glenn Foundation for Medical Research and AFAR Grant for Junior Faculty Ana Maria Cuervo, M.D., Ph.D. has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The National Academy of Sciences elects members based on “recognition of their distinguished and continuing…


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Awardee in the news: Valter Longo’s research on intermittent fasting, immunity and cancer highlighted in Men’s Health

May 09
2018

Awardee in the news: Valter Longo’s research on intermittent fasting, immunity and cancer highlighted in Men’s Health

On May 2, 2018, Men’s Health explored research by 2013 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star Award in Aging Research recipient Valter D. Longo, Ph.D. “Can Intermittent Fasting Actually Improve Your Health?” explores the growing body of research on the health benefits and safety of intermittent fasting. The article highlights a 2014 study done by Dr. Longo and notes that during a four day fast, “both the mice and the cancer patients discarded old blood cells; once the fast was broken, their bodies produced shiny, new cells to take the place of discarded ones, thus effectively regenerating their immune systems.…


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Grantee in the News:  Malaz Boustani’s research in BMJ on the link between antichlolinergic drugs and dementia

May 08
2018

Grantee in the News: Malaz Boustani’s research in BMJ on the link between antichlolinergic drugs and dementia

April 25, 2018, BMJ (formerly the British Medical Journal) published research co-authored by 2005 Paul Beeson Career Development Awards in Aging Research awardee and 2000 Center of Excellence Fellow Malaz Boustani, M.D., M.P.H. In “Anticholinergic drugs and risk of dementia: case-controlled study,” Dr. Boustani and his fellow researchers discovered a strong link between anticholinergic drugs and future dementia risk.  The study concludes: “There are robust associations between levels of anticholinergic antidepressants, antiparkinsons, and urologicals and the risk of a diagnosis of dementia up to 20 years after exposure.” In a related article in PsychCentral, Boustani explains that …


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Experts in News: Steven Austad and Thomas Perls in The Boston Globe on why women live longer than men

May 03
2018

Experts in News: Steven Austad and Thomas Perls in The Boston Globe on why women live longer than men

On April 13, 2018, The Boston Globe featured AFAR Scientific Director Steven Austad, Ph.D. and 1998 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging scholar Thomas T. Perls, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.P. in an article exploring gender differences and aging. “Why women live longer than men- and how men will benefit from it” explores how women universally tend to live longer than men and explains different theories of why women may live longer. Dr. Austad notes that “humans are the only species in which one sex is known to have a ubiquitous…


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Join us May 11th for a webinar on The Dog Aging Project

May 02
2018

Join us May 11th for a webinar on The Dog Aging Project

  Friday, May 11, 2018 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. EDT Register by May 7th here.   On May 11th, the Nathan Shock Centers Coordinating Center and the University of Washington Nathan Shock Center will present the webinar, The Dog Aging Project: Learning From Man’s Best Friend. The Dog Aging Project has made national headlines in scientific and popular media for its innovative approach to understanding human aging by studying canine longevity. This research aims to identify the genetic and environmental factors that underlie healthy aging to develop therapies--such as the use of the FDA-approved drug Rapamycin-- that extend healthy…


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Grantee in the News: Kristine Yaffe in Neurology on how concussions can increase risk of Parkinson’s

May 01
2018

Grantee in the News: Kristine Yaffe in Neurology on how concussions can increase risk of Parkinson’s

On April 18, 2018, Neurology published research co-authored by 2001 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging Scholar  Kristine Yaffe, M.D. In “Mild TBI and risk of Parkinson disease A Chronic Effects of Neurotrauma Consortium Study,” the team’s research reveals that “among military veterans, mTBI is associated with 56% increased risk of PD, even after adjusting for demographics and medical/psychiatric comorbidities.” In a related article in Science Daily, Dr. Yaffe states, “previous research has shown a strong link between moderate to severe traumatic brain injury and an increased risk of developing…


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AFAR in the News: Pfizer’s Get Old website features Stephanie Lederman on health span

May 04
2018

AFAR in the News: Pfizer’s Get Old website features Stephanie Lederman on health span

On May 3, 2018, Get Old—a special website and national campaign by Pfizer Inc-- highlighted AFAR Executive Director Stephanie Lederman, Ed.M. In “Adding Health to Your Years: Life Span vs. Heath Span,” Lederman explains the promising research that AFAR supports to extend health span—our years of health as we age. “By focusing on research that will extend health span, we are essentially working toward solutions that will help people live healthier as they live longer,” Lederman states. AFAR-supported researchers, she notes, are “trying to understand the relationship between biological aging and age-related…


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