News
News

The latest updates from AFAR.

AFAR Grantee, Awardee, and Board member in the News: Bonkowski, Guarente, Mitchell, and Sinclair research on sirutins and longevity published in Cell

Mar 30
2018

AFAR Grantee, Awardee, and Board member in the News: Bonkowski, Guarente, Mitchell, and Sinclair research on sirutins and longevity published in Cell

On March 22, 2018, Cell published research on sirutins and longevity co-authored by several AFAR experts: • 2011 Ellison Medical Foundation/ AFAR Postdoctoral Fellows and 2007 Eweson Series Lecturer Michael Bonkowski, Ph.D. • 2015 Irving S. Wright Award of Distinction winner Leonard Guarente, Ph.D. • 2009 Glenn Foundation for Medical Research and AFAR Grant for Junior Faculty recipient James Mitchell, Ph.D.; and   2000 Glenn Foundation for Medical Research and AFAR Grants for Junior Faculty recipient and Board member David Sinclair, Ph.D. In “Impairment of an Endothelial NAD+-H2S Signaling Network Is a Reversible Cause of Vascular Aging,” the researchers…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News:  Rozalyn Anderson Insights in HealthDay on Calorie Restriction and Longevity

Mar 29
2018

Grantee in the News: Rozalyn Anderson Insights in HealthDay on Calorie Restriction and Longevity

On March 22, 2018, Healthday highlighted the insights of 2016 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award winner Rozalyn Anderson, Ph.D. “Want to Live Longer? Eating a Little Less Might Do the Trick,” explores a new study tested on humans showing that caloric restriction “significantly decreases metabolism” and may lead to a longer lifespan.  The study involved 34 healthy people following a calorie restricted diet for 2 years.  Cited as an AFAR expert, Anderson noted the similarities between the study done on humans and her research on caloric restriction on monkeys. “So much of what they&rsquo…


View MoreREAD MORE


Awardee in the News: Valter Longo’s research on Health Benefits of Fasting in Business Insider

Mar 26
2018

Awardee in the News: Valter Longo’s research on Health Benefits of Fasting in Business Insider

On March 19, 2018, Business Insider highlighted 2013 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star Award in Aging Research recipient Valter D. Longo, Ph.D.   The article, “The amazing ways intermittent fasting affects your body and brain,” explores the many benefits of caloric restriction on health, including potentially improving blood pressure, helping the body process fat, strengthening neural connections, as well as improving memory and mood. The article spotlights Dr. Longo’s research and book The Longevity Diet. Later in the article, Longo cautions “against using the term ‘intermittent fasting’ too broadly.  We know various forms of…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News: Matt Kaeberlein on Implications of Animal Longevity for Human Lifespan in Popular Science

Mar 26
2018

Grantee in the News: Matt Kaeberlein on Implications of Animal Longevity for Human Lifespan in Popular Science

On March 19, 2018, Popular Science highlighted the insights of 2007 Glenn Foundation for Medical Research Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award recipient Matt Kaeberlein, Ph.D. The article, “Look to large bodies to understand long life spans,” focuses on possible reasons different species have very different lifespans. Often larger animals live longer due to having to fend off less predators.  However, there are exceptions such as the quahog clam that lives to 500 years old. Dr. Kaeberlein explains how the long lifespan of smaller animals is partially due to the length of their telomeres. “There’s evidence that telomeres…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantees and Board Member in the News: Anne Brunet, Thomas Rando, Ashley Webb and Xiaoai Zhao co-authored research on the discovery of aggregates in young stem cells in Science

Mar 21
2018

Grantees and Board Member in the News: Anne Brunet, Thomas Rando, Ashley Webb and Xiaoai Zhao co-authored research on the discovery of aggregates in young stem cells in Science

On March 16, 2018, Science published research co-authored by four AFAR-supported researchers based at Stanford University: 2005 Glenn Foundation for Medical Research and AFAR Grants for Junior Faculty recipient Anne Brunet, Ph.D.; Board Member, 1999 Paul Beeson Career Development Scholar, and 2008 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology Award winner Thomas Rando, M.D., Ph.D.; 2012 Ellison Medical Foundation/AFAR Postdoctoral Fellows and 2015 Glenn Foundation for Medical Research and AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty Ashley Webb, Ph.D. and 2016 Glenn/AFAR Postdoctoral Fellowship Program for Translational Research on Aging grantee Xiaoai Zhao, M.D., Ph.D.  In “Lysosome activation clears aggregates and…


View MoreREAD MORE


Nathan Shock Centers Newsletter: Early Spring 2018

Mar 19
2018

Nathan Shock Centers Newsletter: Early Spring 2018

As the Coordinating Center of the Nathan Shock Centers of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging, AFAR is pleased to share the Early Spring 2018 newsletter featuring updates and opportunities from the Centers and the field. In this newsletter: • Listen to recent webinar, co-hosted by the Nathan Shock Centers Coordinating Center and the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington focused on “Incorporating Rigor, Reproducibility, and Transparency Into Aging Projects and Papers.”  • Read the Investigator Spotlight on Dr. Catherine Kaczorowski, a Pilot Grantee and assistant professor at the Jackson Laboratory Nathan Shock Center • Register for…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News: Karyn Frick’s research on rapid action of oestrogens and memory in the Journal of Neuroendrocrinology

Mar 09
2018

Grantee in the News: Karyn Frick’s research on rapid action of oestrogens and memory in the Journal of Neuroendrocrinology

On February 18, 2018, the Journal of Neuroendocrinology published research by 2001 AFAR/Pfizer Research Grant Recipient Karyn Frick, Ph.D. In the article, “Rapid actions of oestrogens and their receptors on memory acquisition and consolidation in females,” Dr. Frick’s research “examines recent developments in the study of the rapid effects of 17β-oestradiol and oestrogen receptor (ER) agonists on learning and memory tasks in female rodents.” The study finds: “in conclusion, although a depiction of the mechanisms underlying oestrogenic enhancement of memory formation in females is slowly materialising, there remains much to be explored, including…


View MoreREAD MORE


AFAR earns 4-Star Rating from Charity Navigator for 5th Consecutive Year

Mar 06
2018

AFAR earns 4-Star Rating from Charity Navigator for 5th Consecutive Year

For the 5th consecutive year, AFAR has earned a 4-star rating from Charity Navigator, America's largest and most-utilized independent evaluator of charities. This is the highest possible rating and shows that AFAR adheres to sector best practices and executes its mission in a financially efficient way. Attaining a 4-star rating verifies that AFAR exceeds industry standards: Only 9% of the charities Charity Navigator evaluates have received at least 5 consecutive 4-star evaluations, indicating that AFAR outperforms most other charities in America. Since 2002, using objective analysis, Charity Navigator has awarded only the most fiscally responsible organizations a 4-star rating. In 2011, Charity Navigator…


View MoreREAD MORE


Awardee in the News: Dr. Riqiang Yan’s research on reversing Amlyoid Plaques linked to Alzheimer’s published in Journal of Experimental Medicine

Mar 01
2018

Awardee in the News: Dr. Riqiang Yan’s research on reversing Amlyoid Plaques linked to Alzheimer’s published in Journal of Experimental Medicine

On February 14, 2018, the Journal of Experimental Medicine published research by 2014 MetLife Foundation Awards for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease recipient Riqiang Yan, Ph.D. In “BACE1 deletion in the adult mouse reverses preformed amyloid deposition and improves cognitive functions,” Dr. Yan’s research shows how blocking BACE1 causes existing amyloid plaques to fade and improves learning behavior in mice. The research was picked up by U.S. News HealthDay, where Dr. Yan states “When we looked at the mice later--at six months old and 10 months old--all those pre-existing plaques were gone…Sequential deletion…


View MoreREAD MORE




BACK TO TOPBACK TO TOP