News
News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Experts in the News: Barzilai, Campisi, and Lithgow featured in three-part BBC News Series on Aging

Dec 27
2017

Experts in the News: Barzilai, Campisi, and Lithgow featured in three-part BBC News Series on Aging

  Between December 18 and 20, 2017, BBC News featured three AFAR experts in a three-part series exploring breakthroughs in aging research: --Deputy Scientific Director and multiple grantee Nir Barzilai, MD --1990 Research Grant for Junior Faculty recipient Judith Campisi, PhD and -- 2006 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award recipient Gordon Lithgow, PhD Dr. Barzilai shares insights on the Targeting Aging with Metformin (TAME) trial in the article “Could drugs delay the diseases of ageing?” Dr. Campisi discusses a future of where we can live healthier as we grow older thanks to drug interventions in the article, “What are…


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Experts in the News: Anderson and de Cabo’s co-edit special journal on Caloric Restriction and Biology of Aging

Dec 27
2017

Experts in the News: Anderson and de Cabo’s co-edit special journal on Caloric Restriction and Biology of Aging

  The January 2018 issue of The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences  has been co-edited by 2016 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award winner Rozalyn Anderson, PhD, FGSA and 2014 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star Award in Aging Research winner Rafael de Cabo, PhD. This issue also marks Dr. Anderson’s debut as co-editor-in-chief, in a related press release notes: "Remarkably, caloric restriction has been shown to be effective in delaying aging in multiple species and the results in humans look equally promising," Anderson said. "Indeed for many studies, CR is used as…


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Grantee in the News: David Merrill's research on Physical Activity and Memory in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

Dec 22
2017

Grantee in the News: David Merrill's research on Physical Activity and Memory in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

On December 12, 2017, the preprint edition of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease published research co-authored by David Merrill, MD, PhD--a 1999 Glenn/AFAR Scholarship in the Biology of Aging receipient and 2010 and 2011 Centers of Excellence Fellow. In the study, "Physical Activity and Hippocampal Sub-Region Structure in Older Adults with Memory Complaints," Dr. Merrill and co-authors Expand on previous research that shows physical activity correlates with higher volume in the hippocampus, a small, memory-critical region deep within the brain As noted in a related story on UCLAHealth.org, the study found: People who walked more than 4,000 steps each day had a…


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Grantee in the News: MSTAR Jessica Rizzuto research on Racial Disparities in Hospice Outcomes in JAGS

Dec 22
2017

Grantee in the News: MSTAR Jessica Rizzuto research on Racial Disparities in Hospice Outcomes in JAGS

On December 18, 2017, the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) published research co-authored by 2016 Medical Student Training in Aging Research (MSTAR) scholar Jessica Rizzuto. The study, "Racial Disparities in Hospice Outcomes: A Race or Hospice-Level Effect?", found that African Americans at the end of life have significantly higher rates of hospital admission, emergency department (ED) visits, and discontinuing (also known as disenrolling from) hospice care than whites. The original research is available by subscription only but a related press release can be read here. Jessica Rizzuto is a Medical Student at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.


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Board Member in the News: David Sinclair on the need for clinical trials to advance age-targeting interventions in WIRED

Dec 19
2017

Board Member in the News: David Sinclair on the need for clinical trials to advance age-targeting interventions in WIRED

On December 15, 2017, WIRED spotlighted 2000 AFAR Research Grant awardee and current Board Member David Sinclair, PhD, in an article exploring what is advancing—and holding back—Biotech innovations in targeting aging to extend healthspan. The article, “Silicon Valley’s Immortalists will help Us All Stay Healthy,” surveys lessons learned from promising drug interventions that target the biological processes of aging in order to extend years of health (not to live forever as the piece’s title implies.) The article notes that without aging being considered an FDA indication, funding for human clinical trials is stalled.…


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Grantees in the News: Barzilai, Kaeberlain, & Sinclair on advances in drugs to treat aging in Nature

Dec 18
2017

Grantees in the News: Barzilai, Kaeberlain, & Sinclair on advances in drugs to treat aging in Nature

On December 13, 2017, Nature.com spotlighted the advancement of drugs that target the processes of aging and related research led by several AFAR experts: - Deputy Scientific Director and multiple grantee Nir Barzilai, MD -2006 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty awardee and 2007 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award winner Matt Kaeberlein, PhD - AFAR board member and 2000 AFAR Research Grant awardee David Sinclair, PhD Framing how the drive to find treatments that offer a long and healthy life is maturing, the article, “New tricks from old dogs join the fight against ageing”, first looks at Dr.…


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Board Members in News: Austad, Barzilai, Kirkland, and Olshansky on TAME in Politico

Dec 15
2017

Board Members in News: Austad, Barzilai, Kirkland, and Olshansky on TAME in Politico

On December 13, 2017, a Politico article explored the potential impact of drugs that target aging can have not only on individual lives but also larger administrative and economic systems. Several AFAR experts were spotlighted: - AFAR Scientific Director Steven Austad, PhD - Deputy Scientific Director Nir Barzilai, MD - 2012 Glenn/AFAR BIG Award winner and AFAR Board President-Elect James L. Kirkland, MD, PhD and - Board member Jay Olshansky, PhD The article, “Why a drug for aging would challenge Washington,” chronicles this team of AFAR’s experts work to start clinical trials to test Metformin as a drug…


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Grantee in the News: Reisa Sperling to lead new Alzheimer’s Clinical Trial Consortium with $70mill NIH grant

Dec 14
2017

Grantee in the News: Reisa Sperling to lead new Alzheimer’s Clinical Trial Consortium with $70mill NIH grant

As part of a team of three physician-scientists, 2003 Beeson Scholar Reisa Sperling, MD, MMSc, has been awarded a $70 million dollar award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to launch the Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials Consortium (ACTC). The Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials Consortium will create a network of 35 Alzheimer’s disease trial sites across the country with the goal of finding new ways to treat or prevent the illness. Dr. Sperling tells the Harvard Gazette: “We must overhaul our current recruitment strategies for clinical trials, particularly to improve the diversity of our study participants and to…


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Grantee in the News: Domenico Praticò on canola oil, memory, and Alz in LA Times and Scientific Reports

Dec 14
2017

Grantee in the News: Domenico Praticò on canola oil, memory, and Alz in LA Times and Scientific Reports

  On December 11, 2017, the LA Times spotlighted research by 1997 AFAR Research Grant and 1999 AFAR/Pfizer Innovations in Aging Research Award recipient Domenico Praticò, MD, originally published in Scientific Reports, linking canola oil to memory loss and severe progression of Alzheimer’s disease in a mice study. The LA Times notes: The mice, which were genetically engineered to develop Alzheimer's later in life, were split into two groups before developing any visible signs of the disease. One group was fed a typical diet while the other was fed the same diet with an additional serving of canola…


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Grantee in the News: Dena Dubal on klotho protein improving mice brain function in SF Chronicle

Dec 13
2017

Grantee in the News: Dena Dubal on klotho protein improving mice brain function in SF Chronicle

On December 8, 2017, the San Francisco Chronicle spotlighted research by 2015 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty recipient, 2009 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging scholar, and 1998 Glenn/AFAR Scholarships for Research in the Biology of Aging recipient Dena Dubal, MD, PhD on the klotho protein improving brain function in mice. The article, “Scientists aim to wipe out dementia and other diseases of aging,” notes: Injections of klotho into the bellies of lab mice have resulted in measurable improvements in brain functions like learning and memory, sometimes as quickly as four hours later, according to recent published…


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AFAR organizes 2017 Beeson Meetings in New Mexico and Ireland

Dec 12
2017

AFAR organizes 2017 Beeson Meetings in New Mexico and Ireland

Recently, AFAR organized two meetings of the Beeson program in the U.S. and abroad. From November 15-18, AFAR hosted the Annual Meeting of the Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging (K76) Program. Over 100 current and former Beeson Scholars, mentors, and foundation supporters gathered in Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico to discuss research progress, share research findings, and strengthen scholarship and leadership. The meeting began with a compelling Keynote Address by Sharon K. Inouye, MD, MPH, Director, Aging Brain Center, Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, and recipient of the 1989 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty,…


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Board Member in the News: Jay Olshansky on Medicare and Age-Related Diseases in Bloomberg

Dec 07
2017

Board Member in the News: Jay Olshansky on Medicare and Age-Related Diseases in Bloomberg

  On December 6, 2017, Bloomberg spotlighted Board Member S. Jay Olshansky, PhD in an opinion piece arguing that Medicare could be adjusted to fit better with the realities of our biology and noting the range of chronic diseases associated with and driven by aging. In “Medicare Should Start at 50,” Bloomberg notes: Just being over 50 is a major risk factor for everything from diabetes to colon cancer to detached retinas. It’s as if the warranty on your body expires. This is not just a casual observation. S. Jay Olshansky, a researcher who studies aging at the University of…


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Webinar Recording: Incorporating Rigor, Reproducibility, and Transparency into Aging Projects

Dec 07
2017

Webinar Recording: Incorporating Rigor, Reproducibility, and Transparency into Aging Projects

  A recording is now available of the webinar, "INCORPORATING RIGOR, REPRODUCIBILITY, AND TRANSPARENCY INTO AGING PROJECTS AND PAPERS", co-hosted on Decemeber 4, 2017 by the Nathan Shock Centers Coordinating Center and the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington. Steven Austad, PhD (AFAR Scientific Director and Director of the Nathan Shock Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham facilitated, and David Allison, PhD, and Andrew Brown, PhD, of the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington presented.   Listen to the webinar here.   The Nathan Shock Centers Coordinating Center, led by AFAR, will host more webinars in 2018.  For updates,…


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Grantee in the News: Sharon Inouye on Post-Operative Delirium in Journal of Alz Disease

Dec 04
2017

Grantee in the News: Sharon Inouye on Post-Operative Delirium in Journal of Alz Disease

On November 28, 2017, The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease published research co-authored by 1989 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty recipient, Sharon K. Inouye, MD, MPH that found that that the severity of post-operative delirium relates to severity of cognitive decline. In “Delirium Severity Post-Surgery and its Relationship with Long-Term Cognitive Decline in a Cohort of Patients without Dementia,“ Dr. Inouye found increasing evidence that the level of delirium in post-surgical patients is associated with the level of later cognitive decline in those same patients and notes in a related press release: "These results challenge the idea that delirium…


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Nathan Shock Centers Coordinating Center Website launches

Dec 03
2017

Nathan Shock Centers Coordinating Center Website launches

As the first Coordinating Center for the Nathan Shock Centers of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging, an initiative funded by the Division of Aging Biology of the National Institute on Aging, has launched a new website at www.nathanshockcenters.org. The website will share news from each of the six Nathan Shock Centers across the country, as well as opportunites, resources, and events in the field and information on the basic biology of aging. Visit the website at www.nathanshockcenters.org Follow NathanShockCtrs on Facebook and Twitter for frequent updates. Sign up to receive the Nathan Shock Centers…


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Grantee in the News: MSTAR Jessica Rizzuto research on Racial Disparities in Hospice Outcomes in JAGS

Dec 22
2017

Grantee in the News: MSTAR Jessica Rizzuto research on Racial Disparities in Hospice Outcomes in JAGS

On December 18, 2017, the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) published research co-authored by 2016 Medical Student Training in Aging Research (MSTAR) scholar Jessica Rizzuto, MPP. The study, "Racial Disparities in Hospice Outcomes: A Race or Hospice-Level Effect?", found that African Americans at the end of life have significantly higher rates of hospital admission, emergency department (ED) visits, and discontinuing (also known as disenrolling from) hospice care than whites. The original research is available by subscription only but a related press release can be read here. Jessica Rizzuto, MPP is a Medical Student at the Icahn School of Medicine at…


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Grantee in the News: MSTAR Jessica Rizzuto research on Racial Disparities in Hospice Outcomes in JAGS

Dec 22
2017

Grantee in the News: MSTAR Jessica Rizzuto research on Racial Disparities in Hospice Outcomes in JAGS

On December 18, 2017, the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) published research co-authored by 2016 Medical Student Training in Aging Research (MSTAR) scholar Jessica Rizzuto. The study, "Racial Disparities in Hospice Outcomes: A Race or Hospice-Level Effect?", found that African Americans at the end of life have significantly higher rates of hospital admission, emergency department (ED) visits, and discontinuing (also known as disenrolling from) hospice care than whites. The original research is available by subscription only but a related press release can be read here. Jessica Rizzuto is a Medical Student at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.


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