News
News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Experts in the News: Barzilai, Campisi, and Kirkland on targeting senescent cells in Nature

Oct 31
2017

Experts in the News: Barzilai, Campisi, and Kirkland on targeting senescent cells in Nature

On October 24, 2017, Nature journal spotlighted several AFAR-affilated experts in an a comprehensive feature article on the growing research on targeting senescent cells through senolytic drugs in order to extend healthspan. The article, “To stay young, kill zombie cells” explains: When a cell enters senescence — and almost all cells have the potential to do so — it stops producing copies of itself, begins to belch out hundreds of proteins, and cranks up anti-death pathways full blast. A senescent cell is in its twilight: not quite dead, but not dividing as it did at its peak. Now biotechnology…


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Grantee in the News: Jason Karlawish research on heightened amyloid levels in JAMA Neurology

Oct 31
2017

Grantee in the News: Jason Karlawish research on heightened amyloid levels in JAMA Neurology

On October 23, 2017, JAMA Neurology published research co-authored by 2007 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging scholar Jason Karlowish, MD, on the impact that knowledge on amyloid protein plaque levels had on cognitively normal older patients at higher risk of Alzheimer’s. As explained in a related press release from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania notes, the published research,  “Comprehension of an Elevated Amyloid Positron Emission Tomography Biomarker Result by Cognitively Normal Older Adults”:  examined cognitively normal adults 65 years and older who had been accepted into a large…


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Awardee in the News: Valter Longo on fasting diet and longevity on CNBC

Oct 25
2017

Awardee in the News: Valter Longo on fasting diet and longevity on CNBC

On October 24, 2017, CNBC spotlighted research by 2013 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star Award in Aging Research recipient Valter D. Longo, PhD on fasting and longevity. The article, “Fasting: A trending food idea and new frontier in longevity science” spotlight’s Dr. Longo’s research at the USC Davis Longevity Institute, noting: Under the direction of the Longevity Institute's Dr. Valter Longo, a fasting diet has been tested on yeast, rodents and a small group of humans. The effects produced lead researchers to argue for larger clinical trials in humans. Longo also has launched a for-profit start-up business,…


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Board Member in the News: Jay Olshansky on healthspan in MarketWatch

Oct 25
2017

Board Member in the News: Jay Olshansky on healthspan in MarketWatch

On October 21, 2017, MarketWatch featured insights by AFAR Board member S. Jay Olshansky, PhD from a recent intensive of the National Press Foundation’s fellowship for reporting on retirement and aging in Washington DC. Dr. Olshansky discussed on the relationship between life expectancy and social security benefits and emphasized the goal of extending years of health, as the article notes: Humans will never live to 150 (our bodies are just not made to withstand that long), Olshansky said. Instead, the focus of life should be on prolonging health and wellness, for which activities like exercising three times a week for 45 minutes…


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Board member in the News: David Sinclair receives 2017 Advance Global Australian Life Sciences Award

Oct 24
2017

Board member in the News: David Sinclair receives 2017 Advance Global Australian Life Sciences Award

Board member and 2000 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty recipient David Sinclair, PhD has been honored with the 2017 Advance Global Australian Life Sciences Award by Advance Global, a network whose  mission is to Our mission is to engage, connect and empower leading global Australians and Alumni; to reinvest new skills, talents and opportunities into Australia. The award was presented at a ceremony on October 10, 2017 at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney. Watch Dr. Sinclair’s acceptance speech here. Learn more about his nomination here and here. David A. Sinclair, PhD is as a Professor of Genetics…


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Board Member in the News: Rudolph Tanzi on new class of Alzheimer's drugs in EBioMedicine

Oct 24
2017

Board Member in the News: Rudolph Tanzi on new class of Alzheimer's drugs in EBioMedicine

In its October 2017 issue, EBioMedicine, an open-access journal jointly published by Cell Press and The Lancet, published research co-authored by AFAR Board member Rudolph E. Tanzi,PhD, on a novel class of drugs that more precisely blocks production of toxic forms of beta-amyloid linked to Alzheimer’s disease. In the article, “Soluble Gamma-secretase Modulators Attenuate Alzheimer's β-amyloid Pathology and Induce Conformational Changes in Presenilin 1,” Tanzi and his co-authors have characterized a new class of drugs as potential therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease and discovered a piece in the puzzle of how they would work. Their…


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Grantee in the News: Jason Butler research on blood stem cell in Journal of Clinical Investigation

Oct 23
2017

Grantee in the News: Jason Butler research on blood stem cell in Journal of Clinical Investigation

On October 16, 2017, The Journal of Clinical Investigation published research co-authored by 2014 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty recipient Jason Butler, PhD on understanding how the body controls the blood stem cell to unlock its full potential to help cure many age-related diseases. In “Endothelial transplantation rejuvenates aged hematopoietic stem cell function,” Butler and his co-authors explore how young bone marrow endothelium revitalizes aging hematopoietic stem cells and present data that could lay the groundwork for therapeutic interventions. This study expands on research funded by AFAR. Read the full article here. Dr. Jason Butler is an Assistant Professor at…


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Awardee in the News—Leonard Guarente on Interventions to Target Aging in Allure

Oct 23
2017

Awardee in the News—Leonard Guarente on Interventions to Target Aging in Allure

On October 18, 2017, Allure magazine featured 2015 Irving S. Wright Award of Distinction winner Leonard Guarente, PhD in an article spotlighting the leaders in aging research on the future of the field and longevity. In the article, “How to Delay the Aging Process, According to Experts,” Dr. Guarente speaks on the potential of interventions that target aging such as the supplement Basis that his company has developed. The interview appears in the November issue of Allure on newstands now. Read the full interview here. Dr. Leonard Guarente is the Novartis Professor of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology …


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Grantee in the News: Felicia Ooi research on roundworm sense of smell and Alz in Newsweek and Science Translational Medicine

Oct 23
2017

Grantee in the News: Felicia Ooi research on roundworm sense of smell and Alz in Newsweek and Science Translational Medicine

On October  17, 2017, Newsweek highlighted research co-authored by 2005 Glenn/AFAR Scholarships for Research in the Biology of Aging recipient Felicia Ooi, PhD on insights roundworms that links smell to triggering protective neural reactions linked to Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Ooi’s research was originally published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.  The Newsweek article, “The Next Medical Breakthrough for Treating Alzheimer’s Could Come From Roundworms” summarizes: “It is interesting as it is to understand the roundworm sense of smell, the work also has a compelling connection to humans. Alzheimer's disease…


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Board member in the News: Thomas Rando’s insights at New Yorker TechFest in Digital Journal

Oct 23
2017

Board member in the News: Thomas Rando’s insights at New Yorker TechFest in Digital Journal

On October 17, 2017, Digital Journal spotlighted perspectives shared by Board Member and 1999 Paul Beeson Career Development Scholar and a 2008 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology Award winner Thomas Rando, MD, PhD at the recent New Yorker TechFest. The article, “Is aging a disease that can be cured?” shares insights from Dr. Rando on how the biological processes of aging drive major age-related diseases and the promise of biomedical research to target aging, noting: While there’s no consensus among experts about whether aging is a disease at all, there’s no question that aging can make people…


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Grantee in News: Laura Gelfman on Palliative care and Heart Failure Patients in JACC

Oct 20
2017

Grantee in News: Laura Gelfman on Palliative care and Heart Failure Patients in JACC

On October 15, 2017, The Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) published research co-authored by 2012 AFAR Hartford Scholar in Geriatric Medicine Laura Gelfman, MD exploring the benefits of palliative care and heart failure patients. In “Palliative Care in Heart Failure: Rationale, Evidence, and Future Priorities,” Dr. Gelfman and co-authors share that patients living with heart failure receive palliative care significantly less often than patients with other illnesses, including cancer, despite evidence that such care improves symptom management and quality of life. The JACC article is accessible by subscription only, but a related feature can be found on here. …


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Awardee in the News: $9 mill NIA grant supports Jan Vijg research, also spotlighted on Salon.com

Oct 19
2017

Awardee in the News: $9 mill NIA grant supports Jan Vijg research, also spotlighted on Salon.com

AFAR 2012 Irving S. Wright Award of Distinction winner Jan Vijg PhD’s research on centenarian genes and life expectancy has recently made headlines. Early this month, Albert Einstein College of Medicine announced that it will share a $9 million grant from the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health to study the genes of centenarians to better understand longevity, led by Dr. Vijg. As shared on Eureka Alert: Rather than study age-related diseases, says Dr. Vijg, "We're focusing on the genetic differences between healthy centenarians and people with no family history of extreme longevity, looking for…


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Grantee in News: Reisa Sperling's research spotlighted in Alzheimers News Today

Oct 17
2017

Grantee in News: Reisa Sperling's research spotlighted in Alzheimers News Today

On October 12, 2017, Alzheimers News Today spotlighted research by 2003 AFAR Beeson Scholar Reisa Sperling, Ph.D. The article, Alzheimer’s Research Marked by Collaboration and Large-scale Projects, Too, surveys collaborations between pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions to drive ahead new therapeutics to treat Alzheimer’s disease.The article notes:  For instance, a group of Harvard Medical School scientists, led by Dr. Reisa Sperling, is running several trials trying to prevent Alzheimer’s disease in people with brain plaque but no cognitive symptoms. These trials are testing various drugs in collaboration with the companies that produce them. …


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Grantee in the News: Liana Apostolova to lead multi-site AD study with 7.6 million NIA grant

Oct 17
2017

Grantee in the News: Liana Apostolova to lead multi-site AD study with 7.6 million NIA grant

Announced October 9, 2017, Indiana University School of Medicine has been awarded a one-year, $7.6 million grant from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) that will establish the infrastructure for AFAR 2005 Beeson Career Development Award winner Liana Apostolova, M.D., to lead a $45 million research program. Dr. Apostolova will lead a multi-site longitudinal observational study to better understand how people develop this rare variant of Alzheimer’s disease. The study, called Longitudinal Early-onset AD Study (LEADS), will establish a network of sites across the United States and will enroll a large cohort of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease participants who will provide…


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Grantees in the News: Five AFAR experts spotlighted in Popular Science

Oct 12
2017

Grantees in the News: Five AFAR experts spotlighted in Popular Science

On October 9, 2017, Popular Science featured a range of AFAR experts in an article on the varied opinions in the field of aging research on strategies to extend healthspan and longevity. The provocatively titled piece “Is Living Forever Going to Suck,” spotlights: 2009 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award recipient and 2016 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star Award in Aging Research recipient Luigi Fontana, MD, PhD   2015 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty recipient Derek  Huffman, PhD   2006 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty awardee and 2007 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award Matthew Kaeberlein, PhD   2012 Glenn…


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Board member in the News: David Sinclair receives NIH Directors High Risk, High Reward award

Oct 09
2017

Board member in the News: David Sinclair receives NIH Directors High Risk, High Reward award

On October 5, 2017, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund's High Risk, High Reward program announced that 2000 AFAR Research Grant recipient and current Board Member David Sinclair, PhD, has received its NIH Directors Pioneer Award for his project, Uncovering the Human Secretome. Dr. Sinclair is one of 12 Pioneer Awards. The High-Risk, High-Reward Research program, part of the NIH Common Fund, funds 86 awards to exceptionally creative scientists proposing to use highly innovative approaches to tackle major challenges in biomedical research. The program supports high-risk ideas with high-impact potential. The program accelerates scientific discovery by supporting high-risk research proposals that may…


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Awardee in News: Dongsheng Cai's research on hypothalamus stem cells in R&D magazine

Oct 03
2017

Awardee in News: Dongsheng Cai's research on hypothalamus stem cells in R&D magazine

On September 29, 2017, R&D magazine reported on research by 2017 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star in Aging Research Award recipient Dongsheng Cai, MD, PhD linking the stem cells in the hypothalamus and aging. The article, Stem Cells Could be Key to Extending Lifespan, explains Dr. Cai’s discovery that stem cells in the brain’s hypothalamus govern how fast aging occurs in the body, which could result in new strategies for warding off age-related diseases and extending lifespan. As Dr. Cai notes: “Our research shows that the number of hypothalamic neural stem cells naturally declines over the life…


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