News
News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Board Member in the News: S. Jay Olshansky shares insights on telomeres in healthy aging in WebMD

Apr 28
2017

Board Member in the News: S. Jay Olshansky shares insights on telomeres in healthy aging in WebMD

On April 19, 2017, WebMD featured insights from AFAR board member, S. Jay Olshansky, PhD, on how large of a role telomeres play in extending human healthspan. The article, What Tiny Telomeres May Tell Us About Aging, highlights different ideas existing on telomeres (the protective tips on the ends of chromosomes) and aging. One theory speculates living a healthy lifestyle might stabilize telomeres or increase telomerase and help prevent aging. Some doctors and scientists argue that idea oversimplifies the science and the topic needs further research.  Dr. Olshansky cautions: “Are they the magic bullet that will allow us to live…


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Grantee Spotlight Interview: Yin Shen, PhD

Apr 27
2017

Grantee Spotlight Interview: Yin Shen, PhD

AFAR’s grant programs in the biology of aging are central to our mission to support and advance healthy aging through biomedical research. At leading institutions nationwide, our grantees hard work, ingenuity, and leadership are advancing cutting-edge research that will help us all live healthier, longer. In this Grantee Spotlight interview, 2016 New Investigator Awards in Alzheimer's Disease recipient, Yin Shen, PhD shares what inspired her to enter the field of aging research and what impact she hopes her research will make thanks to AFAR’s support. Read Dr. Shen’s Grantee Spotlight Interview here.


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Grantee in the News: Christopher van Dyck on his exercise and Alzheimer’s study in the New Haven Register

Apr 27
2017

Grantee in the News: Christopher van Dyck on his exercise and Alzheimer’s study in the New Haven Register

On April 22, 2017, the New Haven Register reported on 1995 AFAR Research Grant recipient, Christopher van Dyck, MD and his team’s research on the effect physical activity has on slowing the progression of Alzheimer’s disease symptoms. The article, Yale seeks participants for study of exercise’s effects on Alzheimer’s, details a phase three study observing the correlation between exercise and cognitive abilities. The study will consist of two groups of 300 sedentary adults between the ages of 65 and 89 years old. For four days a week over an 18-month period, one group will perform aerobic exercises, and…


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Partner Event: the 16th MIXiii-BIOMED 2017 Conference and Exhibition featuring AFAR panel

Apr 26
2017

Partner Event: the 16th MIXiii-BIOMED 2017 Conference and Exhibition featuring AFAR panel

On May 23, 2017, approximately 6,000 senior executives, scientists, and engineers will convene at the 16th MIXiii-BIOMED 2017 Conference and Exhibition in Tel Aviv, Israel. Co-sponsored by AFAR, this is premier meeting for players of Israel’s healthcare industry with their colleagues from around the globe. This annual meeting is co-organized by leading international healthcare institutions with the objective of exposing industry participants to leaders and experts to share knowledge and ideas. As part of this program, four AFAR experts will be presenting a panel,  “Longevity: Genetics and Epigenetics”. The presenters are Scientific Director Steven Austad, PhD; Deputy Scientific Director…


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AFAR in the News: Scientific Director Steven Austad and multi-AFAR grantee Brian Kennedy on Metformin and Rapamycin in True Viral News

Apr 24
2017

AFAR in the News: Scientific Director Steven Austad and multi-AFAR grantee Brian Kennedy on Metformin and Rapamycin in True Viral News

On March 29, 2017, True Viral News featured insights from AFAR Scientific Director Steven Austad, PhD, and 2009 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star Award in Aging Research, 2003 AFAR Research Award, and 2008 Julie Martin Mid-Career Award in Aging Research recipient, Brian K. Kennedy, PhD on metformin and rapamycin. The article, Could a Pill Put the Breaks on Aging?, takes an in-depth look at two drugs with potential to increase human healthspan: metformin and rapamycin. The subject of the AFAR-managed Targeting Aging with Metformin (TAME) Trial, metformin is the most common drug prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. The drug is also believed to encourage cell mitochondria…


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Grantee Spotlight Interview: Jennifer L. Garrison, PhD

Apr 24
2017

Grantee Spotlight Interview: Jennifer L. Garrison, PhD

AFAR’s grant programs in the biology of aging are central to our mission to support and advance healthy aging through biomedical research. At leading institutions nationwide, our grantees hard work, ingenuity, and leadership are advancing cutting-edge research that will help us all live healthier, longer. In this Grantee Spotlight interview, 2016 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty recipient, Jennifer Garrison, PhD shares what inspired her to enter the field of aging research and what impact she hopes her research will make thanks to AFAR’s support. Read Dr. Garrison’s Grantee Spotlight Interview here.


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Grantee in the News: Ian Lanza on how interval exercise improves muscle cells, in Cell Metabolism

Apr 20
2017

Grantee in the News: Ian Lanza on how interval exercise improves muscle cells, in Cell Metabolism

On March 7, 2017, Cell Metabolism published research co-authored by 2011 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty recipient, Ian R. Lanza, PhD on how interval exercise strengthens and increases cell mitochondria previously reduced and weakened from aging. The researchers took baseline measurements for aerobic fitness, blood-sugar levels, gene activity, and mitochondrial health of the muscle cells of 72 sedentary participants, broken into two groups. One group was comprised of individuals aged 30 years or younger, and the other was comprised of individuals older than 64 years of age. The participants were assigned either to weight training, interval exercise, moderate aerobic exercise with light weight training, or…


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Board Member in the News: Scientific Director Steven Austad on high-risk factors for heart disease linked to later-in-life Alzheimer’s disease in HealthDay

Apr 18
2017

Board Member in the News: Scientific Director Steven Austad on high-risk factors for heart disease linked to later-in-life Alzheimer’s disease in HealthDay

On April 11, 2017, HealthDay News featured insights from AFAR’s Scientific Director Steven Austad, PhD on a study revealing middle-aged people who were high-risk for heart disease were more likely to have elevated brain amyloid deposition (proteins associated with Alzheimer’s disease) decades later. The article, A Healthy Middle-Aged Heart May Protect Your Brain Later, describes a study that examined heart health data from nearly 350 participants, around 52 years of age, and followed-up using brain scans about 25 years later. None of these participants started the study with dementia, but the follow-ups found that a participant with two or more risk…


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Grantee in the News: S. Duke Han on brain differences and risk of financial exploitation in HealthDay

Apr 18
2017

Grantee in the News: S. Duke Han on brain differences and risk of financial exploitation in HealthDay

On April 13, 2017, HealthDay News featured insights from 2012 Paul B. Beeson Emerging Leaders Career Development Award in Aging winner, S. Duke Han, PhD in an article on how brain impairments in older adults may impact their vulnerability to financial exploitation. The article, Seniors' Brain Changes Could Make Them Vulnerable to Scams, explains research that compared the brains of two groups of 13 older adults who were exposed to exploitative schemes. One group had been financially-manipulated, and the other group had recognized and avoided the scams. Forty-five behavioral tests were performed on both groups to measure aspects such as memory, personality, financial reasoning,…


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Grantee Spotlight Interview: Shin-Ichiro Imai, MD, PhD

Apr 18
2017

Grantee Spotlight Interview: Shin-Ichiro Imai, MD, PhD

AFAR’s grant programs in the biology of aging are central to our mission to support and advance healthy aging through biomedical research. At leading institutions nationwide, our grantees hard work, ingenuity, and leadership are advancing cutting-edge research that will help us all live healthier, longer. In this Grantee Spotlight interview, 2016 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award winner Shin-Ichiro Imai, MD, PhD, shares what inspired him to enter the field of aging research and what impact he hopes his research will make thanks to AFAR’s support. Read Dr. Imai’s Grantee Spotlight Interview here.


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Grantees in the News: Sei J. Lee, Alexander Smith, and Kenneth Covinsky co-author 10-year Study on Older Adults and Managing Medications and Finances

Apr 17
2017

Grantees in the News: Sei J. Lee, Alexander Smith, and Kenneth Covinsky co-author 10-year Study on Older Adults and Managing Medications and Finances

On April 7, 2017, the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society published a study co-authored by 1999 Beeson scholar, Kenneth E. Covinsky, MD, PhD, MPH, 2010 Center of Excellence Fellow and 2011 Beeson scholar, Sei J. Lee, MD, MAS, and 2012 Beeson scholar, and 2011 Center of Excellence Fellow, Alexander K. Smith, MD, MS, MPH, among others. The aim of the study was to examine the frequency of developing difficulty in managing medications and finances in older adults. In Difficulty Managing Medications and Finances in Older Adults: A 10-year Cohort Study, the authors enlisted 9,434 participants, aged 65 and older, who didn’t need assistance managing medications or…


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AFAR in the News: Nir Barzilai and Thomas Perls on the significance of behavior and genes in longevity

Apr 14
2017

AFAR in the News: Nir Barzilai and Thomas Perls on the significance of behavior and genes in longevity

On March 27, 2017, Kaiser Health News published an article featuring 1997 Beeson Scholar and 2007 AFAR Award Grantee and Deputy Scientific Director Nir Barzilai, MD and 1998 Beeson Scholar Thomas Perls, MD, MPA, FACP on factors impacting longevity. The article explores different lifestyles among centenarians and turns to our experts on the matter of increasing human lifespan. Dr. Perls explains that most people have the genes to live until their late 80’s, so behaviors, such as diet and smoking, have a larger impact up until that point. Genetics appears to have more influence on why people reach 90 years or older. The article draws…


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Grantee in the News: Arti Hurria interviewed on providing optimal care for older breast cancer patients by Medscape.com

Apr 14
2017

Grantee in the News: Arti Hurria interviewed on providing optimal care for older breast cancer patients by Medscape.com

On April 7, 2017, Arti Hurria, MD, a 2005 Beeson Scholar, was interviewed on Medscape on how to best meet the needs of older patients diagnosed with breast cancer. Dr. Hurria emphasizes the importance of providing patients with individualized care based their geriatric assessment and functional age, and then utilizing that information as part of the treatment decision-making process. She advocates for older patients and their doctors to use an online geriatric assessment tool found on the Cancer and Aging Research Group website for appointment speed and efficiency. Dr. Hurria also discusses her research finding that age (72 years old and older) is a…


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Grantee in the News: Viviana Perez in Aging Cell on new mechanism of Rapamycin

Apr 07
2017

Grantee in the News: Viviana Perez in Aging Cell on new mechanism of Rapamycin

On April 5, 2017, Aging Cell Journal published research co-authored by 2008 Ellison Medical Foundation/AFAR Postdoctoral Fellow and 2013 AFAR Research Grant recipient, Viviana I. Perez, PhD., which details new insights into the drug, rapamycin. The article explains that rapamycin was already known to increase a regulator that activates genes to reduce cells secreting damaging compounds as we age. This secretion of damaging compounds creates a toxic environment called, senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Dr. Perez and fellow Oregon State University researchers have discovered that rapamycin could also affect levels of SASP directly, and in a way that would protect neurons and other types…


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AFAR in the News: David Sinclair and Steve Austad on the TAME Trial on Discovery’s Seeker.com

Apr 06
2017

AFAR in the News: David Sinclair and Steve Austad on the TAME Trial on Discovery’s Seeker.com

On March 31, 2017, Discovery’s Seeker.com, which is dedicated to curiosity and innovation, featured AFAR Board Member and 2000 Research Grant recipient, David Sinclair, PhD, and Scientific Director, Steve Austad, PhD, in an article on the progress of the TAME (Targeting Aging with Metformin) Trial, which AFAR is helping manage. The article discusses the challenges in TAME’s goal of seeking FDA recognition of aging as a treatable medical condition. The FDA currently only approves drugs for specific “indications” or recognized medical conditions--of which aging is currently not classified as one. The TAME Trial—led by…


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AFAR in the News: Two-time AFAR Grantee, David M. Sabatini, MD, PhD receives Lurie Prize in Biomedical Sciences from the Foundation for the NIH

Apr 06
2017

AFAR in the News: Two-time AFAR Grantee, David M. Sabatini, MD, PhD receives Lurie Prize in Biomedical Sciences from the Foundation for the NIH

David M. Sabatini, MD, PhD, recipient of the 2015 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology Award and the 2009 The Julie Martin Mid-Career Award in Aging Research, has been awarded the Lurie Prize in Biomedical Sciences by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH). Dr. Sabatini was awarded this prize for identifying the mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) cellular pathway as a key regulator of growth and metabolism in response to nutrients and its impact on age-related diseases. The prize includes a $100,000 honorarium donated by Ms. Ann Lurie, philanthropist and FNIH Board Member. Ms. Lurie states, “The Lurie Prize in…


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National Institute on Aging selects AFAR as the first Coordinating Center for the Nathan Shock Centers for Excellence in the Biology of Aging.

Apr 04
2017

National Institute on Aging selects AFAR as the first Coordinating Center for the Nathan Shock Centers for Excellence in the Biology of Aging.

The American Federation for Aging Research has been selected by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) as the first Nathan Shock Centers for Excellence in the Biology of Aging Coordinating Center. AFAR has received first-year funding of $444,018 with a total of $1.3 million expected over a three-year award period. There are a total of six Nathan Shock Centers of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging across the United States. The Centers aim to provide leadership and technical support in the pursuit of basic research into the biology of aging by administering local pilot grant funds and leading national annual meetings…


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National Institute on Aging selects AFAR  as the first Coordinating Center for the Nathan Shock Centers for Excellence in the Biology of Aging.

Apr 04
2017

National Institute on Aging selects AFAR as the first Coordinating Center for the Nathan Shock Centers for Excellence in the Biology of Aging.

The American Federation for Aging Research has been selected by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) as the first Nathan Shock Centers for Excellence in the Biology of Aging Coordinating Center. AFAR has received first-year funding of $444,018 with a total of $1.3 million expected over a three-year award period. There are a total of six Nathan Shock Centers of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging across the United States. The Centers aim to provide leadership and technical support in the pursuit of basic research into the biology of aging by administering local pilot grant funds and leading national annual meetings…


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National Institute on Aging selects AFAR as the first Coordinating Center for the Nathan Shock Centers for Excellence in the Biology of Aging.

Apr 04
2017

National Institute on Aging selects AFAR as the first Coordinating Center for the Nathan Shock Centers for Excellence in the Biology of Aging.

The American Federation for Aging Research has been selected by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) as the first Nathan Shock Centers for Excellence in the Biology of Aging Coordinating Center. AFAR has received first-year funding of $444,018 with a total of $1.3 million expected over a three-year award period. There are a total of six Nathan Shock Centers of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging across the United States. The Centers aim to provide leadership and technical support in the pursuit of basic research into the biology of aging by administering local pilot grant funds and leading national annual meetings…


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