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News

The latest updates from AFAR.

AFAR in the News: AFAR experts explore Silicon Valley’s quest for longevity in The New Yorker

Mar 30
2017

AFAR in the News: AFAR experts explore Silicon Valley’s quest for longevity in The New Yorker

The April 3, 2017 issue of The New Yorker highlights Silicon Valley’s rising interest in longevity.  An article, “Silicon Valley’s Quest to Live Forever” features insights from several AFAR-affiliated experts: • Nir Barzilai, MD, AFAR Deputy Scientific Director, 2010 Irving S. Wright Award of Distinction winner, and multiple-grantee recipient • Leonard Guarente, PhD, winner of the 2015 Irving S. Wright Award of Distinction • Matt Kaeberlein, PhD, winner of the 2011 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star in Aging Research • Pankaj Kapahi, PhD, recipient of the 2011 Julie Martin Mid-Career Award in Aging Research • Richard…


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Journal of AGS article spotlights lasting impact of AFAR and John A. Hartford Foundation’s Centers of Excellence program

Mar 29
2017

Journal of AGS article spotlights lasting impact of AFAR and John A. Hartford Foundation’s Centers of Excellence program

On March 17, 2017, AFAR co-authored an article in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society on the lasting impact created by the 28 John. A. Hartford Foundation Centers of Excellence in Geriatric Medicine and Geriatric Psychiatry, which AFAR supported as the National Program Office. In 1998, the John A. Hartford Foundation established these Centers to provide adequate numbers of faculty to meet the nation’s geriatric training and research needs. In the years since, this initiative has supported 1,164 fellows and junior faculty in geriatric medicine, geriatric psychiatry, and related specialties and sub-specialties. Using two evaluations, the article reports these supported fellows and…


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Board Member in the News: David Sinclair, PhD Uncovers Pivotal Finding in Repairing DNA Damage

Mar 24
2017

Board Member in the News: David Sinclair, PhD Uncovers Pivotal Finding in Repairing DNA Damage

On March 24, 2017, Science Journal published significant researched partially funded by AFAR and lead by AFAR Board Member and 2000 Research Grant Recipient David Sinclair, PhD, on preventing age-related and radiation-induced DNA damage using the nucleotide, NMN. Dr. Sinclair and his research team found that mice pre-treated with NMN showed lower levels of DNA damage after undergoing harmful radiation. Additionally, they also determined older mice given NMN had a decline in molecular markers that signal DNA damage, and an equal ability to repair damaged DNA as young mice. The study reveals remarkable insights in mice that are anticipated to carry over in…


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AFAR in the News: Scientific Director Steven Austad, PhD on Potential Longevity-Extending Drug

Mar 23
2017

AFAR in the News: Scientific Director Steven Austad, PhD on Potential Longevity-Extending Drug

On March 15, 2017, WABC Birmingham, Alabama interviewed AFAR Scientific Director Steven Austad, PhD, in a segment exploring the drug, Rapamycin, and its impact on longevity and age-related diseases. In the interview, Dr. Austad discusses his work previously using Rapamycin in mice, and the promising outlook for the drug in upcoming human trials. Dr. Austad describes Rapamycin’s effect in mice as “almost a miracle drug”. He believes this medication has the ability to slow the progression of age-related diseases and extend longevity. Watch full video here. Steven Austad, PhD  is a Distinguished Professor and Department Chair in…


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AFAR in the News: AFAR co-signs letter to President on importance research and health agencies.

Mar 23
2017

AFAR in the News: AFAR co-signs letter to President on importance research and health agencies.

On March 1, 2017, an article in McKnight’s Senior Living summarized a letter signed by AFAR and 72 other health-related organizations to the President.  The letter highlights the important work that public health agencies perform for the country. The groups specifically pointed out important roles that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Health Resources and Services Administration, the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration play in ensuring safety in everyday, emergency, and national security situations. Read the article and entire letter here.   For more insights on the impact of biomedical research on health…


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Grantee in the News: Domenico Praticò, MD on earliest sign of Alzheimer’s and preventative protein

Mar 23
2017

Grantee in the News: Domenico Praticò, MD on earliest sign of Alzheimer’s and preventative protein

On March 8, 2017, Rawstory.com reported on findings from 1999 AFAR/Pfizer Innovations in Aging Research Award recipient Domenico Praticò, M.D. on detecting and preventing Alzheimer’s disease, originally published in the online journal Translational Psychiatry. Dr. Praticò and his research team proved declining glucose levels in the brain are a direct trigger for cognitive impairments related to Alzheimer’s. To discover this earlier sign of the disease is groundbreaking. Before this finding, memory loss and cognitive decline were the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s. Knowing declining brain glucose levels before other symptoms appear give researchers…


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AFAR in the News: Irving Wright Award winners on deaths prevented by WI-38 cell strain

Mar 20
2017

AFAR in the News: Irving Wright Award winners on deaths prevented by WI-38 cell strain

On March 8, 2017, Healio.com featured 1984 Irving S. Wright Award of Distinction winner Leonard Hayflick, Ph.D., and Board Member and 2016 Irving S. Wright winner, S. Jay Olshansky, Ph.D. The article explored their work calculating the number of deaths prevented by Hayflick’s WI-38 human cell strain discovery. In 1962, Dr. Hayflick produced the WI-38 human cell strain as a safer way to grow the viruses needed to produce vaccines against a number of diseases. The AFAR affiliates estimated that this human cell strain prevented 4.5 billion cases of disease and 10.3 million deaths worldwide over the course of more than five…


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Board Member in the News: CNN features Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D. on the cost of Alzheimer's

Mar 20
2017

Board Member in the News: CNN features Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D. on the cost of Alzheimer's

On March 7, 2017, CNN recently quoted Board Member and 1995 MetLife Foundation Awards for Medical Research in Alzheimer's Disease recipient Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D., in its March 7 article on the distressing rate of Alzheimer's diease and its related costs. Dr. Tanzi, an expert in Alzheimer’s and other neurological diseases, offered his perspective on the impending financial impacts of Alzheimer’s. The article describes how significant investment in research has created a decline in deaths from almost all major diseases in the U.S., except for Alzheimer's. Alzheimer's fatalities have doubled in the last 15 years,…


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Grantees in the News: Three Beeson Scholars research cognitive function of older adults with TBI

Mar 09
2017

Grantees in the News: Three Beeson Scholars research cognitive function of older adults with TBI

The March 7, 2017  issue of the open access, peer-reviewed journal Plos Medicine features research collaboratively published by three of AFAR's Beeson Scholars: 2015 Beeson Scholar Raquel Gardner, MD; 2003 Beeson Scholar Kenneth Langa, MD, PhD; and 2001 Beeson Scholar Kristine Yaffe, MD. In “Subjective and objective cognitive function among older adults with a history of traumatic brain injury: A population-based cohort study,” the trio proposes: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is extremely common across the lifespan and is an established risk factor for dementia. The cognitive profile of the large and growing population of older adults with prior TBI who…


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4 Stars for 4 Years: AFAR receives highest rating from Charity Navigator

Mar 08
2017

4 Stars for 4 Years: AFAR receives highest rating from Charity Navigator

AFAR has earned an outstanding accomplishment that only 10% of non-profits nationwide can claim: the highest rating for four consecutive years from Charity Navigator. Charity Navigator, the largest and most-utilized independent evaluator of charities in the country, ranks organizations based on their best practices and carrying out its mission in a financially efficient way. The highest rating of 4-stars means AFAR upholds strong financial health and exemplifies an unwavering commitment to transparency and accountability. As Charity Navigator President and CEO Michael Thatcher notes: “Attaining a 4-star rating verifies that American Federation for Aging Research exceeds industry standards and outperforms most…


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Expert in the News: CoE officer Rosanne Leipzig on Gero-Sensitizing Clinicians

Mar 07
2017

Expert in the News: CoE officer Rosanne Leipzig on Gero-Sensitizing Clinicians

A March 3, 2017 article on MedicalExpress.com features the insights of Rosanne Leipzig, MD, PhD, a site officer of the John A. Hartford Foundation’s Center of Excellence in Geriatric Medicine and Geriatric Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. In “Geriatricians can help aging patients navigate multiple ailments,” Leipzig describes the goal of making all clinicians more sensitive to the needs of older patients. Dr. Leipzig notes: "We've been trying to get all clinicians trained in what we call the '101 level' of geriatrics," said Dr. Rosanne Leipzig, a professor…


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Grantee in the News: David Marcinek on Mitochondrial therapies on Scientia.com

Mar 07
2017

Grantee in the News: David Marcinek on Mitochondrial therapies on Scientia.com

This month, Scientia.com presented a research brief by 2015 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award recipient David Marcinek, PhD. In “Guiding Aging Research into Maturity,” Marcinek explores therapies for advancing therapies for mitochondrial dysfunction. He notes: Our research focuses on how changes in mitochondria energetics and oxidative stress affect the pathological and adaptive signalling in skeletal muscle. We have found that some pathological conditions associated with ageing may be more dynamic than previously thought and could be rapidly reversed by targeted intervention with agents such as elamipretide to restore redox or energetic balance. Read the full report…


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AFAR encourages scientific, banking, and public sectors to address financial elder abuse

Mar 03
2017

AFAR encourages scientific, banking, and public sectors to address financial elder abuse

Earlier this year, New York Governor Cuomo and US Senator Kirsten Gillibrand both introduces plans to prevent financial elder abuse on the state and federal levels, and AFAR applauds their commitment. As a range of AFAR-supported researchers have explored how cognitive changes make older adults vulnerable to financial exploitation, AFAR welcomes opportunities to engage the research, banking, and public sectors and apply the insights we are learning through biomedical research on the cognitive changes that older citizens face, which put them at risk for financial exploitation. In a related press release, AFAR shares perspectives from our board president Mark Lachs,…


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Introducing the American Federation for Aging Research’s new Board President and new Board Members:

Mar 24
2017

Introducing the American Federation for Aging Research’s new Board President and new Board Members:

At the December 2016 AFAR board meeting, Mark S. Lachs, M.D., M.P.H., was appointed President of the Board of Directors and Rudolph E. Tanzi, Ph.D. was elected as a board member. Mark S. Lachs, M.D., M.P.H., is the Director of Geriatrics for the New York Presbyterian Health System, and Professor of Medicine and Co-Chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology at Weill Medical College. Dr. Lachs is pioneer in researching elder abuse and serves as the Executive Director at the New York City Elder Abuse Center. A member of the Board of Directors…


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Grantees in the News: Three Beeson Scholars research cognitive function of older adults with TBI

Mar 09
2017

Grantees in the News: Three Beeson Scholars research cognitive function of older adults with TBI

The March 7, 2017  issue of the open access, peer-reviewed journal Plos Medicine features research collaboratively published by three of AFAR's Beeson Scholars: 2015 Beeson Scholar Raquel Gardner, MD; 2003 Beeson Scholar Kenneth Langa, MD, PhD; and 2001 Beeson Scholar Kristine Yaffe, MD. In “Subjective and objective cognitive function among older adults with a history of traumatic brain injury: A population-based cohort study,” the trio proposes: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is extremely common across the lifespan and is an established risk factor for dementia. The cognitive profile of the large and growing population of older adults with prior TBI who…


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