News
News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Awardee in the News: Valter Longo’s research on pancreas regeneration & fasting diet in BBC News

Feb 28
2017

Awardee in the News: Valter Longo’s research on pancreas regeneration & fasting diet in BBC News

On February 24, 2017, BBC News spotlighted research by 2013 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star Award in Aging Research recipient Valter D. Longo, PhD.  Longo’s research found that a fasting-diet regenerated a diabetic pancreas in mice models. Cautioning that such a sophisticated diet should not be tried at home,  Longo explains the potential for human application, as BBC News notes: Dr. Longo said: "Medically, these findings have the potential to be very important because we've shown - at least in mouse models - that you can use diet to reverse the symptoms of diabetes. "Scientifically, the findings are perhaps…


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Grantee in the News: Nathan LaBrasseur's research linking biology of aging to deadly lung disease

Feb 27
2017

Grantee in the News: Nathan LaBrasseur's research linking biology of aging to deadly lung disease

Nature Communications recently published research co-authored by 2002 Glenn/AFAR Scholarships for Research in the Biology of Aging recipient Nathan K. LaBrasseur, MS, PhD, which links the biology of aging with the deadly, yet little understood, lung disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. As a related article in Science Daily reports: A Mayo Clinic study has shown evidence linking the biology of aging with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a disease that impairs lung function and causes shortness of breath, fatigue, declining quality of life, and, ultimately, death. Researchers believe that these findings, which appear in Nature Communications, are the next step toward a possible…


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Grantee in the News: MSTAR Marc Weinberg research on muscle mass and chemotherapy

Feb 27
2017

Grantee in the News: MSTAR Marc Weinberg research on muscle mass and chemotherapy

Health Medicine Network recently reported on research published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research co-authored by 2015 Medical Student Training in Aging Research (MSTAR) scholar Marc Weinberg that explores if muscle composition could be a predictor of chemotherapy side effects. As Health Medicine Network reports: Researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center report in the journal Clinical Cancer Research that a tool developed at UNC could potentially help doctors better identify patients at high risk for toxic side effects that could require hospitalizations. Shlomit Strulov Shachar, MD, the study’s first author, said they found that…


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Experts in the News: Six AFAR researchers lend insights to TIME magazine 2017 Longevity issue

Feb 24
2017

Experts in the News: Six AFAR researchers lend insights to TIME magazine 2017 Longevity issue

The February 16, 2017 “Longevity” issue of TIME magazine spotlighted several AFAR experts in features stories. “How Silicon Valley Is Trying to Hack Its Way into Longevity” explored super-pills to target aging and featured 2015 Irving S. Wright Award of Distinction winner Leonard Guarente, PhD and his work with Elysium Health. The ProLon five-day, ultra-low calerie meal kit developed by 2013 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star Award in Aging Research winner Valter Longo, PhD is also highlighted. 2016 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award recipient Rozalyn Anderson, PhD, also comments on caloric restriction. In “Do Cranky People Really Die Younger…


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Grantees in News: Hansen and Kumsta on heat stress and autophagy in Nature and Science

Feb 23
2017

Grantees in News: Hansen and Kumsta on heat stress and autophagy in Nature and Science

On February 15, 2017, Nature Communications published research led by 2014 Julie Martin Mid-Career Award in Aging Research recipient Malene Hanson, PhD with 2013 Ellison Medical Foundation/AFAR Postdoctoral Fellows in Aging Research Program recipient Caroline Kumsta, PhD. In “Hormetic heat stress and HSF-1 induce autophagy to improve survival and proteostasis in C. elegans,” Hansen and Kumsta looked at the effect of heat on cellular stress of the C. elegans worm. Their findings demonstrate that the cellular process of autophagy contributes to stress resistance. In a related article in Science Magazine, “What doesn’t kill you makes your stronger,”…


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Grantee in the News:  Donovan Maust in NY Times on rise of older adults using multiple psychotropics

Feb 23
2017

Grantee in the News: Donovan Maust in NY Times on rise of older adults using multiple psychotropics

A February 13, 2017 article in The New York Times highlighted research led by 2014 Beeson Scholar Donovan T. Maust, MD. In “Sharp Rise Reported in Older Americans’ Use of Multiple Psychotropic Drugs,” the Times notes: The research team, led by Dr. Donovan T. Maust of the University of Michigan and Dr. Mark Olfson of Columbia University, analyzed data from annual government surveys of office-based doctors. The team focused on office visits by people 65 or older that resulted in the prescribing of at least three of a list of psychiatric, sleep and pain medications like Valium, Prozac, OxyContin and Ambien.…


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Grantee in the News: Beeson Gerardo Moreno on Language Barriers and Kidney Transplants

Feb 21
2017

Grantee in the News: Beeson Gerardo Moreno on Language Barriers and Kidney Transplants

The February 2017 issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology published research co-authored by 2012 Beeson Scholar Gerardo Moreno, MD, MSHS, on the effect of linguistic barriers and access to kidney transplants. In “Linguistic Isolation and Access to the Active Kidney Transplant Waiting list in the United States," Moreno and colleagues’ findings suggest that patients who primarily speak a language other than English may face disparities that keep them from completing their kidney transplant evaluation and ultimately receiving a kidney transplant. The findings suggest that patients who primarily speak a language other than English may face…


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Grantee in the News: Beeson Scholar and Chair Thomas M. Gill on physical activity and disability

Feb 21
2017

Grantee in the News: Beeson Scholar and Chair Thomas M. Gill on physical activity and disability

On February 7, The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society published new research by 1997 Beeson Scholar and current Beeson Program Advisory Committee Chair Thomas Michael Gill, MD, on the LIFE study looking at physical activity and older adults. In “Effect of Physical Activity on Self-Reported Disability in Older Adults: Results from the LIFE Study,”  Gill and his co-authors tested the hypothesis that a long-term structured, moderate intensity physical activity (PA) program is more effective than a health education (HE) program in reducing the risk of self-reported dependency and disability in basic activities of daily living (BADLs), disability in…


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Experts in the News: Austad, Barzilai, and Olshansky on Telomere home testing

Feb 10
2017

Experts in the News: Austad, Barzilai, and Olshansky on Telomere home testing

On February 8, 2017, a WCBS New York segment featured expert commentary by AFAR Scientific Director Steven Austad, PhD; Deputy Scientific Director and multiple AFAR grantee Nir Barzilai, MD; and board member Jay Olshansky, PhD. Produced by CBS medical correspondant Max Gomez, PhD, the segment explores a new home telomere test that has entered the market to monitor your cellular age as a predictor of chronological aging or health. AFAR experts explain the complexity of telomeres and caution against the novelty of such tests. Watch the clip here. Steven Austad, PhD, is a Distinguished Professor and Department Chair at the University of…


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Bad Science makes Big Headlines: Scientific Director Steven Austad's latest Huff/Post50 column

Feb 03
2017

Bad Science makes Big Headlines: Scientific Director Steven Austad's latest Huff/Post50 column

While "fake news" is all-to-often heard in the political arena, neither academic publishing nor scientific journalism are immune to misleading headlines and invalid findings. If journalists can be fooled by bogus or simply bad science, how is a layperson supposed to sort out the hype from the help? In his latest column for Huffington Post's Post50 section, AFAR Scientific Director Steven Austad, PhD, explores the lure of misleading headlines as well as dubious studies, and offers a range of tips to help any reader critically evaluate news on aging research. Read "Bad Science makes Big Headlines" here. Steven Austad,…


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Experts in the News: Haass and Tanzi on TREM2 levels and Alzheimer's in Neurology Today

Feb 03
2017

Experts in the News: Haass and Tanzi on TREM2 levels and Alzheimer's in Neurology Today

The February 2, 2017 issue of Neurology Today reports on recent research by Christian Haass, PhD, who received the AFAR-administered MetLife Foundation Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease in 2015. The article discusses research that Haass originally published as senior author in the December 14, 2016 issue of Science Translational Medicine. In “Levels of Immune Marker TREM2 Rise Years Before Alzheimer's Disease Becomes Apparent” Neurology Today notes: Researchers reported that TREM2 levels rise early on in the progression of Alzheimer's disease, and that the biomarker might be useful in clinical research to evaluate the benefits of…


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