News
News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Grantee in the News: Scott Turner leads phase 2 study of cancer drug to treat Alzheimer’s.

Jan 30
2017

Grantee in the News: Scott Turner leads phase 2 study of cancer drug to treat Alzheimer’s.

A January 26, 2017 Alzheimer’s News Today story reports on a Phase 2 study led by 1998 Beeson Scholar R. Scott Turner, MD, PhD at Georgetown University Medical Center to study a cancer drug’s effect on Alzheimer’s disease.  With Turner serving as principal investigator, the study is recruiting participants for a clinical trial to evaluate the cancer drug Tasigna (nilotinib) in people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s  in order to evaluate how low doses of Tasigna impact safety, biomarkers, and clinical outcomes. The Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation is supporting this clinical trial…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee Spotlight Interview: Changhan David Lee, Ph.D.

Jan 26
2017

Grantee Spotlight Interview: Changhan David Lee, Ph.D.

As we enter a new year, AFAR is proud to introduce the recipients of its 2016 Biology of Aging Grants through Grantee Spotlight Interviews. Here, AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty awardee Changhan David Lee, PhD, shares what inspired him to enter the field of aging research and what impact he hopes his research will make thanks to AFAR’s support. Read Dr. Lee's Grantee Spotlight Interview here.


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News: Beeson Scholar Timothy Miller's research on drugs that target Tau reduction

Jan 25
2017

Grantee in the News: Beeson Scholar Timothy Miller's research on drugs that target Tau reduction

2010 Paul Beeson Career Development Awards in Aging Research Scholar Timothy Miller, MD, PhD, is the senior author of a recently published study in the January 25, 2017 issue of Science Translational Medicine. In “Tau reduction prevents neuronal loss and reverses pathological tau deposition and seeding in mice with tauopathy,” Miller and his co-authors explore how a drug compound has shown to halt Alzheimer’s related damage in mice. As the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis summarizes: Under ordinary circumstances, the protein tau contributes to the normal, healthy functioning of brain neurons. In some people, though, it…


View MoreREAD MORE


Awardees in the News: Rozalyn Anderson and Rafael de Cabo co-author Caloric Restriction Study

Jan 20
2017

Awardees in the News: Rozalyn Anderson and Rafael de Cabo co-author Caloric Restriction Study

2016 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award winner Rozalyn Anderson, PhD, and 2014 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star Award in Aging Research winner Rafael de Cabo, PhD, are among the co-authors of a collaborative study on caloric restriction and aging published in Nature Communications online on January 17, 2017. By focusing on the rhesus monkey as an excellent model for human aging due to genetic similarities and rates of aging,  “Caloric restriction improves health and survival of rhesus monkeys” presents insights that the health benefits from caloric restriction could apply to humans. The collaborative article examines data from two studies…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News: Meera Sheffrin's study on Patient Desire for Alzheimer's Predictive Testing

Jan 20
2017

Grantee in the News: Meera Sheffrin's study on Patient Desire for Alzheimer's Predictive Testing

A January 17 story in Psychiatric Times, "Do Patients Want to Know Whether Alzheimer Disease Awaits Them?" built on recently published research by 2013 and 2014 John A. Hartford Foundation’s Centers of Excellence in Geriatric Medicine and Geriatric Psychiatry Fellow Meera Sheffrin, MD. The article explored the study “Desire for predictive testing for Alzheimer’s disease and impact on advance care planning: a cross-sectional study,” which Sheffrin co-authored and published in the December 2016 issue of the journal Alzheimer’s Research & Therapy. As Psychiatric Times notes: Interest in predictive testing for Alzheimer disease (AD) and advanced…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News: Randall Bateman on latest DIAN-TU trial in Reuters' BioWorld Today

Jan 19
2017

Grantee in the News: Randall Bateman on latest DIAN-TU trial in Reuters' BioWorld Today

Reuters’ BioWorld Today recently highlighted insights of two-time AFAR grantee and 2015 recipient of the AFAR-administered MetLife Foundation Award for Medical Research in Alzheimer’s Disease, Randall Bateman, MD. Under Bateman’s leadership, a research team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis  has selected a third investigational drug to be tested in the worldwide DIAN-TU trial. As BioWorld notes: The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer's Network Trial Unit (DIAN-TU) study, involves people with an inherited predisposition to develop AD at a young age, usually in their 30s, 40s or 50s. Participants already enrolled will continue…


View MoreREAD MORE


AFAR in the News: Austad, Barzilai, and Longo comment on the Oldest Incoming President in the Washington Post

Jan 18
2017

AFAR in the News: Austad, Barzilai, and Longo comment on the Oldest Incoming President in the Washington Post

AFAR Scientific Director Steven Austad, Deputy Scientific Director Nir Barzilai,  and 1998 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty awardee and 2013 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star in Aging Research Award recipient Valter Longo lent insights to a January 18 article exploring the health of the incoming president in The Washington Post. “Trump’s health: What we could expect with the oldest incoming president” explores the potential impact of stress, lifestyle, genetics, and age-related diseases on Donald Trump’s current health. Early in the article, Austad addresses the relationship between stress and health: Given that the 45th president will be…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News: Gabrielle Fredman lends insights on research linking caffeine and heart health

Jan 17
2017

Grantee in the News: Gabrielle Fredman lends insights on research linking caffeine and heart health

2016 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty awardee Gabrielle Fredman, Phd, recently lent insights in a January 16 HealthDay article on new research linking caffeine and cardiovascular health. In “Can Coffee Perk Up Heart Health, Too?”, Fredman not only assesses a recently published study in Nature Medicine looking at caffeine intake and reduced cardio vascular inflammation, but also highlights that this study  "points to some molecular "targets" for new treatments to fight chronic inflammation.” As Healthday notes: Scientists are trying to develop treatments that target specific culprits in the chronic inflammation process. Whether caffeine could be one of…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News: Beeson Scholar Christopher Callahan on fatigue and

Jan 17
2017

Grantee in the News: Beeson Scholar Christopher Callahan on fatigue and "normal" aging

1996 Beeson Scholar Christopher Callahan, MD, recently lent insights to an article in Michigan's Daily Tribune on common misconceptions regarding fatigue and aging. In “Feeling tired or weak? Don’t Assume its just aging,” Callahan notes that fatigue, weakness and depression aren’t expected consequences of growing older. The article further examines symptoms that  older patients often assume are consequences of "normal" aging. Read the full article here. Christopher Callahan, MD, is the Cornelius and Yvonne Pettinga Professor of Medicine and Director, Indiana University Center for Aging Research at Indiana University. For more…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee Spotlight Interview: Rozalyn Anderson, PhD

Jan 12
2017

Grantee Spotlight Interview: Rozalyn Anderson, PhD

  As we enter a new year, AFAR is proud to introduce its 2016 Biology of Aging grantees through Grantee Spotlight Interviews. Here, 2016 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award winner Rozalyn Anderson, PhD, shares what inspired her to enter the field of aging research and what impact she hopes her research will make thanks to AFAR’s support. Read Dr. Anderson's Grantee Spotlight Interview here:


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News:  latest research by Thomas Perls on Biomarkers on Aging in Aging Cell journal

Jan 09
2017

Grantee in the News: latest research by Thomas Perls on Biomarkers on Aging in Aging Cell journal

On January 6, 2017, Anatomical Society’s open access journal, Aging Cell, published new research co-authored by 1998 Beeson Scholar Thomas Perls, MD, MPA, FACP, on biomarkers as indicators or predictors of aging. In “Biomarker signatures of aging,” Perls and his co-authors posed: Because people age differently, age is not a sufficient marker of susceptibility to disabilities, morbidities, and mortality. We measured nineteen blood biomarkers that include constituents of standard hematological measures, lipid biomarkers, and markers of inflammation and frailty in 4704 participants of the Long Life Family Study (LLFS), age range 30–110 years, and used an agglomerative algorithm…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantees in the News: Campisi, Kaeberlein, and Sinclair on The Telomere Effect

Jan 06
2017

Grantees in the News: Campisi, Kaeberlein, and Sinclair on The Telomere Effect

In the popular scientific publications STAT News and Scientific American, several AFAR-affiliated experts have lent insights on the publication of the recently published book, The Telomere Effect. On January 3, 2017, AFAR board member and 2000 AFAR Research Grant awardee David Sinclair, PhD and 1990 AFAR Research Grant winner Judi Campisi, PhD lent expert commentary to a STAT News feature: The book argues that “you can actually lengthen your telomeres — and perhaps your life — by following sound health advice, the authors argue, based on a review of thousands of studies.” Sinclair comments:  “I think it&rsquo…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News: Stephen Helfand on RNA pathways and Longevity

Jan 05
2017

Grantee in the News: Stephen Helfand on RNA pathways and Longevity

On December 21, 2016, Nature Communications published research co-authored by 2014 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award grantee, Stephen Helfand, MD, which shows the major role that an RNA pathway plays in longevity, based studying Drosphilia flies. In A somatic piRNA pathway in the Drosophila fat body ensures metabolic homeostasis and normal lifespan, Helfand and his co-authors are “the first to show that the anti-TE activity of the piRNA pathway also operates in a normal non-reproductive body tissue, the fly fat body, and that it helps to sustain the life of the animal,” as reported in News Medical. Read…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News: Anthony Rosen's research on Sensitizing Radiologists on Signs of Elder Abuse

Jan 04
2017

Grantee in the News: Anthony Rosen's research on Sensitizing Radiologists on Signs of Elder Abuse

The December 2016 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) featured new research co-authored by 2007 MSTAR scholar and 2016 Beeson Scholar Anthony Rosen, MD. In “Radiologists' Training, Experience, and Attitudes About Elder Abuse Detection,” Rosen and his co-authors explore how radiologists can be better trained to detect signs of detect elder abuse. The study was picked up in a related article on PsychCentral.com, where Rosen notes: “Radiologists are a core part of the medical team in child abuse cases, so why shouldn’t they be a core part of the team in elder abuse?” Rosen…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News: Malaz Boustani studies common OTC drugs & increased ER visits for older adults

Jan 03
2017

Grantee in the News: Malaz Boustani studies common OTC drugs & increased ER visits for older adults

MedicalExpress.com  recently reported on a study co-authored by two-time AFAR grant recipient, Malaz Boustani, MD, MPH, published in the peer-reviewed journal Pharmacotherapy.  The study has found that anticholinergic medications, a class of drugs very commonly used by older adults, are linked to an increased rate of emergency department and hospital utilization in the United States. As Medical Express reports: Drugs with anticholinergic properties are frequently prescribed or purchased over the counter for chronic conditions including depression, anxiety, pain, allergy, incontinence or sleep problems. These drugs are used by as many as half of older adults and it…


View MoreREAD MORE


Beeson Scholar Christopher Callahan on fatigue and

Jan 17
2017

Beeson Scholar Christopher Callahan on fatigue and "normal" aging

1996 Beeson Scholar Christopher Callahan, MD, recently lent insights to an article in Indiana's Daily Tribune on common misconceptions regarding fatigue and aging. In “Feeling tired or weak? Don’t Assume its just aging,” Callahan notes that fatigue, weakness and depression aren’t expected consequences of growing older. The article further examines symptoms that often go untreated because older patients often assume are consequences of "normal" aging. Read the full article here. Christopher Callahan, MD, is the Cornelius and Yvonne Pettinga Professor of Medicine and Director, Indiana University Center for Aging Research at Indiana…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News: Malaz Boustani studies common OTC drugs & increased ER visits for older adults

Jan 03
2017

Grantee in the News: Malaz Boustani studies common OTC drugs & increased ER visits for older adults

MedicalExpress.com  recently reported on a study co-authored by two-time AFAR grant recipient, Malaz Boustani, MD, MPH, published in the peer-reviewed journal Pharmacotherapy.  The study has finds that anticholinergic medications, a class of drugs very commonly used by older adults, are linked to an increased rate of emergency department and hospital utilization in the United States. As Medical Express reports: Drugs with anticholinergic properties are frequently prescribed or purchased over the counter for chronic conditions including depression, anxiety, pain, allergy, incontinence or sleep problems. These drugs are used by as many as half of older adults and it…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News: Malaz Boustani studies common OTC drugs & increased ER visits for older adults

Jan 02
2017

Grantee in the News: Malaz Boustani studies common OTC drugs & increased ER visits for older adults

MedicalExpress.com  recently reported on a study co-authored by two-time AFAR grant recipient, Malaz Boustani, MD, MPH, published in the peer-reviewed journal Pharmacotherapy.  The study has finds that anticholinergic medications, a class of drugs very commonly used by older adults, are linked to an increased rate of emergency department and hospital utilization in the United States. As Medical Express reports: Drugs with anticholinergic properties are frequently prescribed or purchased over the counter for chronic conditions including depression, anxiety, pain, allergy, incontinence or sleep problems. These drugs are used by as many as half of older adults and it…


View MoreREAD MORE




BACK TO TOPBACK TO TOP