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The latest updates from AFAR.

AFAR in the News: Board Member Norman Relkin Shares Tips on Brain Health

Jun 30
2015

AFAR in the News: Board Member Norman Relkin Shares Tips on Brain Health

On June 30th, 2015 publications including HealthDay and WebMD featured comments from Board Member Dr. Norman Relkin on the importance of maintaining an active and health life style in order to maximize brain health. Dr. Relkin discusses how healthier living increases the amount of “brain reserve” or the ability of the brain to weather various changes such as aging.  He states, “The more brain reserve a person brings to the table, the older they can get without showing signs and symptoms of memory loss.” Norman Relkin, MD, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Clinical…


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Grantee in the News: Troy Ghashghaei Studies Function of the MARCKS Protein

Jun 30
2015

Grantee in the News: Troy Ghashghaei Studies Function of the MARCKS Protein

On May 25, 2015, the journal Aging Cell published new research from 2010 AFAR Research Grant Recipient Troy Ghashghaei on the function of the MARCKS protein. MARCKS is found in the brain and helps to maintain the function of the ependymal cells, or the cells which form a protective barrier around the brain.  Dr. Ghashghei’s team found that when MARCKS was removed from ependymal cells oxidative stress increased and the brain aged rapidly.  This research shows that MARCKS may play an essential role in the speed of brain aging. Read the complete paper here or see a…


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Grantees in the News: Beeson Scholars Comment on the Improvement of Coronary Care in NY Times

Jun 25
2015

Grantees in the News: Beeson Scholars Comment on the Improvement of Coronary Care in NY Times

On June 19, 2015, The New York Times spotlighted the remarkable 38% decline in the death rate from coronary heart disease between 2003 and 2013, and featured commentary by 1996 Beeson Scholar Harlan Krumholz, MD and 1998 Beeson Eric Peterson, MD, MPH. Improvements in medical treatments, drugs, and procedures have all resulted in the steep decease in the death rate.  Dr. Peterson comments, “Heart disease mortality is dropping like a stone. This is a reason why.” The improvements in care have resulted in universal improvements at both small and large medical centers across the country.  Research from Dr. Krumholz has also found that…


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AFAR in the News: AFAR leadership in Nature piece on the clinical trial potential of drugs targeting age-related diseases

Jun 22
2015

AFAR in the News: AFAR leadership in Nature piece on the clinical trial potential of drugs targeting age-related diseases

On June 17, 2015, Nature journal spotlighted the Targeting Aging with Metformin (TAME) Trial  spearheaded by AFAR Deputy Scientific Director Dr. Nir Barzilai and explored its larger implications for aging research. On June 24th, Dr. Barzilai will lead a group meeting to engage the FDA in a discussion about recognizing aging as an indication that is appropriate for clinical trials. If successful, the TAME Trial could prove that a drug targeting aging can be an effective method of delaying the onset of aging-related diseases, including cancer, heart disease, and cognitive impairment. As AFAR’s executive director, Stephanie Lederman, notes in…


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Grantee in the News: Valter Longo research on Caloric Restriction in TIME, ABC News, and more

Jun 18
2015

Grantee in the News: Valter Longo research on Caloric Restriction in TIME, ABC News, and more

Research by two-time AFAR Valter Longo, PhD, has recently captured major media attention.  Longo is a 1998 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty awardee and the 2013 recipient of the Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star Award in Aging Research. Originally published in the of Cell Metabolism, Dr. Longo’s research found that in yeast, mice, and human trials, short-term, fasting-like diets reduced risk factors related to aging, diabetes, cardiovascular, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. In addition to this prominent scholarly publication, TIME Magazine’s June 18th issue reported on the study, which was later picked up by both ABCNews, The…


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Board Member in the News: Richard Besdine raises awareness of Elder Financial Exploitation

Jun 11
2015

Board Member in the News: Richard Besdine raises awareness of Elder Financial Exploitation

On June 10, 2015, The Huffington Post debuted AFAR Medical Director Dr. Richard Besdine’s latest column, “Elder Financial Exploitation: A Crime AND a Serious Health Risk.”  Part of a two-part series preceded by the column “Why Elder Abuse is Everyone’s Problem,” the article explores why elder financial exploitation--the most common form of elder abuse--is a topic of importance for medical professionals working with older adults. Besdine and featured experts from the medical and financial sectors provide insight into how to recognize signs of financial exploitation and offers resources for caregivers and financial managers. …


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Grantee in the News: Ian Lanza’s Research on Age-Related Mitochondrial Function Decline

Jun 11
2015

Grantee in the News: Ian Lanza’s Research on Age-Related Mitochondrial Function Decline

Research co-authored by 2011 AFAR Research Grant for Junior Faculty Ian Lanza, PhD, was recently published in the May 2015 issue of Aging Cell. Dr. Lanza and his collaborators looked at the effect of the dietary supplement, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), on improving the decline of age-related mitochondrial function in mice.  The team found that EPA, which is found in fish oil, may help to improve mitochondrial protein quality in older mice that have already shown signs of decline. Read the full article here. Ian Lanza, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic. Learn more about the…


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MetLife Award Winner in The News: Lary Walker Uses Prion Model to Study Alzheimer’s

Jun 03
2015

MetLife Award Winner in The News: Lary Walker Uses Prion Model to Study Alzheimer’s

On May 29, 2015, Nature highlighted research by 2014 MetLife Foundation Award for Medical Research recipient Dr. Lary Walker that is applying methods used for Prion disease research to look at Alzheimer’s-related protein folding. Although the symptoms of Prion, a relativity rare disease caused by improper folding of the prion (PRP) protein, are very different that these of Alzheimer’s disease, Dr. Walker believes that Alzheimer’s research can learn from the techniques used by peers studying Prion. By studying differences in shape of misfolded amyoid-β proteins, researchers will be able to better understand differences in…


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