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News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Grantee in the News: Malaz Boustani in the NY Times New Old Age blog

Sep 24
2014

Grantee in the News: Malaz Boustani in the NY Times New Old Age blog

A September 26th article in The New York Time’s New Old Age blog cited, 2000 Center of Excellence Fellow and 2005 Beeson Scholar, Malaz Boustani, M.D. As a featured expert in this article, Dr. Boustani praised the methods used by French and Canadian researchers on a study connecting Anxiety Drugs to increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. The studies found that long-term use of benzodiazepine based medications resulted in a 51 percent increased risk of developing dementia.  While it is not yet clear whether this relationship is a causation or a correlation, Dr. Boustani believes the research…


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Grantee in the News: Dr. Timothy Platts-Mills Find Malnutrition May be a Serious Health Concern for Older Adults

Sep 11
2014

Grantee in the News: Dr. Timothy Platts-Mills Find Malnutrition May be a Serious Health Concern for Older Adults

On September 11, 2014 the New York Times’ New Old Age Blog featured findings by 2014 Center of Excellence Fellow, Timothy Platts-Mills, MD, stating that as many of 60% of adults ages 65 and over seeking emergency room care may be malnourished or at risk of malnourishment. Dr. Platts-Mills’ research follows-up on earlier findings that large percentages of older adults in hospitals, nursing homes, and rehabilitation centers may be suffering from malnutrition. Malnutrition can cause serious health concerns including muscle wasting, fatigue, weakness, functional decline, risk of infections, exacerbation of chronic illness and death.  Common cause of malnutrition include,…


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Grantee in the News: David Walker Identifies Gene That May Slow Aging Process

Sep 04
2014

Grantee in the News: David Walker Identifies Gene That May Slow Aging Process

On September 4, 2014, Cell Reports released research authored by 2009 AFAR Award recipient, David Walker, Ph.D., showing that activation of the gene AMPK in fruit flies increased average lifespan by 30%, from roughly 6 to 8 weeks. AMPK, a gene that also exists in humans, is a key energy sensor in cells and is activated only when cellular energy is low.  Once activated, AMPK helps to cleanse the cell of old and damaged cellular components.  Dr. Walker’s team found that activating the gene in one organ, such as the easier to access intestines, also initiated AMPK in harder…


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