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News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Grantee in the News: Beeson Scholar Kristine Yaffe Finds a Healthy Young Heart Cuts Alzheimer’s Risk

Mar 31
2014

Grantee in the News: Beeson Scholar Kristine Yaffe Finds a Healthy Young Heart Cuts Alzheimer’s Risk

In a March 31st article, the Daily Mail profiled 2001 AFAR Beeson Scholar Dr. Kristine Yaffe’s 1983 - 2013 Coronary Artery Risk Development Study, which indicated that healthier levels of blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol in your 20s result in better heart and brain health later in life. By following 3,330 18-30 year olds for 25 years, Dr. Yaffe discovered that individuals with small signs of deteriorating heart health at a young age had poorer cardiovascular health and cognitive function in their 50s and 60s. Dr. Yaffe’s research had the potential to decrease diagnoses of Alzheimer’s disease and…


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Grantee in the News: AFAR Postdoctoral Fellow Sofiya Milman Finds Common ‘Anti-Aging’ Treatment May Shorten Life

Mar 27
2014

Grantee in the News: AFAR Postdoctoral Fellow Sofiya Milman Finds Common ‘Anti-Aging’ Treatment May Shorten Life

On March 27, 2014 LiveScience spotlighted 2012 Glenn/AFAR Postdoctoral Fellow Dr. Sofiya Milman’s study showing that injects of Human Growth Hormones (HGH), a commercial advertised “anti-aging” treatment, may have negative effects on longevity.     Dr. Milman’s investigation found that people over 90 with naturally below average levels of HGH had a much greater chance of living to 100 than individuals with higher levels of the hormone.  After a 1990s study showed that HGH injects increased muscle mass and bone density, and decreased body fat, the treatment was touted as an anti-aging cure.  This claim…


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Grantees in the News: Beeson Scholar Reisa Sperling Works to Catch Early Signs of Alzheimer's

Mar 19
2014

Grantees in the News: Beeson Scholar Reisa Sperling Works to Catch Early Signs of Alzheimer's

On March 19th, 2014, NPR highlighted AFAR grantee, Reisa Sperling, MD’s work to expand the detection and treatment of people whose biomarkers indicate they are at risk of developing dementia. Dr. Sperling’s new treatment has successfully slowed cognitive decline among individuals with early dementia symptoms and her promising A4 study will determine whether the drug has preventative qualities. If successful, this treatment will have a monumental impact in preventing dementia and curving the growth in Alzheimer’s patients. (Dr. Sperling's study was also featured in a recent Daily Beast article that proposed new approaches to…


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Industry News: Women are at the Epicenter of Alzheimer’s Disease

Mar 19
2014

Industry News: Women are at the Epicenter of Alzheimer’s Disease

The recently released Alzheimer’s Association’s 2014 Facts and Figures report revealed that, by comprising the majority of both patients and caregivers, women are disproportionally effected by Alzheimer’s disease.  One in six women over 65, compared with one in eleven men, will develop Alzheimer’s in their lifetime.  Additionally, women are 2.5 time more likely to take on the emotional and fiscal burden of being the primary care giver of a person with Alzheimer’s disease. As the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, all people are at risk of…


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AFAR in the News: The Wall Street Journal Article on Protein Intake Cites AFAR

Mar 12
2014

AFAR in the News: The Wall Street Journal Article on Protein Intake Cites AFAR

A March 12th article in The Wall Street Journal spotlighted AFAR’s pioneering April 2013 symposium, “Optimal Protein Intake in Older Adults." The article explored the dichotomy between the negative longevity effects of high-protein diets on individuals under the age of 66 and the healthy-aging outcomes of the same diet for older adults Also sited was 1998 AFAR Research in the Biology of Aging grantee and 2013 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star Award in Aging Research honoree, Valter Longo, Ph.D., Edna M. Jones Professor of Gerontology at the University of Southern California, Davis. For more expert tips on nutrition…


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Grantees in the News: Harlan Krumbolz & Dae Hyum Kim Question Heart Procedure in The New York Times

Mar 12
2014

Grantees in the News: Harlan Krumbolz & Dae Hyum Kim Question Heart Procedure in The New York Times

AFAR 2011 Center of Excellence Fellow, Dr. Dae Hyum Kim, and 1996 Beeson Scholar, Dr. Harlan Krumbolz were cited in a March 12 piece in The New York Time’s New Old Age blog to compare the popular new Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement, T.A.V.R.,  procedure with more traditional surgery for patients with the heart condition, aortic stenosis. With one third of elderly patients facing a fatal risk from traditional aortic stenosis surgery, the procedure is not suitable for everyone.   Though early praise pointed to T.A.V.R., which replaces the valve without a major…


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Grantees in the news: Former Beeson scholar receives $8 million grant from the Alzheimer’s Association

Mar 07
2014

Grantees in the news: Former Beeson scholar receives $8 million grant from the Alzheimer’s Association

2003 Paul Beeson Career Award in Aging Research winner Reisa Sperling, MD, recently received the largest grant ever given by the Alzheimer’s Association (http://www.alz.org/), $8 million, to expand research on the development and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. The study, called A4, will “follow 1,000 adults, aged 65 to 85, who have abnormal proteins, known as amyloid plaques, revealed by brain scans, and who are exhibiting subtle cognitive problems that are typically reported in people years before they are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.” Half of the patients will receive a potentially beneficial drug which blocks amyloid…


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Grantees in the News: Two-time Grantee Sei Lee, MD Questions Common Geriatric Treatments

Mar 07
2014

Grantees in the News: Two-time Grantee Sei Lee, MD Questions Common Geriatric Treatments

AFAR Beeson awardee and Hartford Foundation CEO scholar, Sei Lee, MD, Associate Professor in the Division of Geriatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, was featured in The New York Times The New Old Age blog, on March 7th, spotlighting his work on the American Geriatric’s Society’s second annual top ten list of treatments that older adults and providers should question.  Dr. Lee suggested valuable topics that topics aging adults and their caregivers should discuss with their doctors, including the risks of over-screening, dementia drugs called cholinesterase inhibitors, and appetite stimulants before beginning…


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AFAR Grantee Valter Longo, PhD, on the effect of animal protein in older adults

Mar 05
2014

AFAR Grantee Valter Longo, PhD, on the effect of animal protein in older adults

AFAR grantee Valter Longo, Ph.D., led a study profiled by NPR on March 5, which “found that Americans who ate a diet rich with animal protein during middle age were more likely to die from cancer and other causes.” The study, which tracked 6,000 older adults, used a survey to track diet patterns in middle-aged and older adults. While eating too much red meat or other protein-rich meats during middle age proved harmful, for adults over 65, a protein-abundant diet actually increased longevity and overall wellbeing. According to Dr. Longo, these effects are explained by changes in IGF-1, a growth…


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Grantees in the News: Barzilai and Atzmon discover mutation that protects against type 2 diabetes

Mar 03
2014

Grantees in the News: Barzilai and Atzmon discover mutation that protects against type 2 diabetes

2011 AFAR Grant recipient Gil Atzmon, Ph.D. and AFAR Deputy Scientific Director Nir Barzilai, M.D., were among the co-authors of a study published on March 2, 2014 in the journal Nature Genetics that identifies a genetic mutation that protects again type 2 diabetes, even for those considered to be at-risk. The study was based on the genetic testing of 150,000 people and found that this particular mutation, which destroys a gene used by pancreas cells where insulin is made, reduces the risk of the development of the disease by two-thirds. Individuals with the gene mutation produce more insulin and have lower blood glucose…


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