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The latest updates from AFAR.

Grantees in the News: Dr. Scott Small on how, where, and why Alzheimer's Disease spreads

Dec 22
2013

Grantees in the News: Dr. Scott Small on how, where, and why Alzheimer's Disease spreads

Former Beeson scholar Scott Small, MD, published research in the journal Nature Neuroscience on December 22 that used high-resolution functional MRI imaging to discern how, where, and why Alzheimer’s develops in the lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC), and over time, spreads from the LEC to other areas of the cerebral cortex. The study clarified previous understandings of Alzheimer’s disease formation, and could improve detection of the disease before the onset of symptoms. Read more from the Huffington Post UK here. Dr. Small was a 2000 recipient of the Paul Beeson Career Development Award in Aging Research. He is currently…


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Grantees in the News: Ariel Green, MD, discusses the emotional effects of aging

Dec 20
2013

Grantees in the News: Ariel Green, MD, discusses the emotional effects of aging

On December 19, former grantee Ariel Green, MD, published an article in the New York Times Well blog describing the often-overlooked emotional effects of aging on the body. While physical effects of age, such as weight loss, can be obvious to doctors and loved ones, the emotional effects caused by loss—of friends, family, independence, and physical capability—play a large role in the overall aging process. Dr. Green describes her decision to become a geriatrician as an opportunity to understand these changes and improve patients’ quality of life for the better: “One reason I chose geriatrics…


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Grantees in the News: Carlos Cruchaga, PhD, identifies gene variants that double risk of AD

Dec 11
2013

Grantees in the News: Carlos Cruchaga, PhD, identifies gene variants that double risk of AD

A team of researchers led by AFAR 2013 New Investigator in Alzheimer's Disease awardee Carlos Cruchaga, PhD, recently published findings in the journal Nature that “identified variations in a gene that doubles a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease later in life.” As is common in such studies, the research focused on analyzing the DNA of families with a history of Alzheimer’s disease. The findings, published December 11, indicate the possibility of identifying individuals at risk for AD before symptoms occur and potentially offering preventative treatments. Read Washington University in St. Louis’…


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AFAR featured in Chronicle of Higher Education article on Geroscience

Dec 09
2013

AFAR featured in Chronicle of Higher Education article on Geroscience

The Chronicle of Higher Education recently published an excellent overview of the promise of geroscience to extend health span. Steven Austad, PhD, AFAR's 2014 Scientific Director elect, shares optimism for the near-future impact of biomedical research on aging and its related diseases: "This is just no longer pie-in-the-sky," said Mr. Austad, who is also scientific director of the American Federation for Aging Research, a foundation that has given out about $200-million to some 3,000 researchers since 1981. "Almost everybody in the field is convinced that it's only a matter of time until we start to validate some of these things in…


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AFAR responds to

Dec 05
2013

AFAR responds to "On Dying After Your Time" in NY Times

AFAR is encouraged by the lively dialogue around Aging in The New York Times this week, sparked by "On Dying After Your Time" by Daniel Callahan. On December 4, thoughtful letters by AFAR Deputy Scientific Director Steve Austad, PhD; AFAR board member S. Jay Olshansky, PhD; and former grantee and Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star in Aging Research awardee Brian Kennedy, PhD of the Buck Institute were published in response. Read the dialogue here.  


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AFAR launches “Longevity Dividend” issue of the Public Policy & Aging Report

Dec 02
2013

AFAR launches “Longevity Dividend” issue of the Public Policy & Aging Report

AFAR is proud to have co-sponsored with the Gerontological Society of America (GSA) a special issue of the respected Public Policy & Aging Report, “The Longevity Issue: Geroscience Meets Geropolitics”. In this 28-page report, the authors showcase work in the emerging interdisciplinary field of geroscience, which is based on the knowledge that aging itself is the major risk factor for most chronic diseases prevalent in the older population.  Finding a way to slow the biological processes of aging will do more to extend the period of healthy life in humans than attacking individual diseases alone, the report…


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AFAR panel featured in Elsevier Connect

Dec 02
2013

AFAR panel featured in Elsevier Connect

AFAR's recent media briefing on Can We Delay Aging? captured the attention of Elsevier Connect, the world’s leading provider of science and health information that serves more than 30 million scientists, students and health and information professionals worldwide. Read more about the briefing and see the article here.


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Grantees in the News: Drs. Wesley Ely and Malaz Boustani Featured for Work in Post-ICU Patient Care

Dec 02
2013

Grantees in the News: Drs. Wesley Ely and Malaz Boustani Featured for Work in Post-ICU Patient Care

Beeson Scholars E. Wesley Ely, MD, and Malaz Boustani, MD, were featured in a November 25th article in The Wall Street Journal on recent efforts by hospitals to combat the negative effects frequently suffered by patients after their release from the intensive-care unit (ICU).  It is estimated that up to 80% of patients suffer from cognitive or brain dysfunction after a stay in the ICU, and damaging emotional and physical effects are also common.  Many hospitals are taking steps to improve outcomes for ICU patients.  Dr. Ely, a professor at Vanderbilt University, stresses the importance of rehabilitation for…


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