The New Investigator Awards in Alzheimer's Disease for 2015

Todd Cohen

Todd Cohen

Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Novel Post-translational Mechanisms that Mediate Neurodegeneration in Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease Dr. Cohen’s lab is exploring new molecular approaches to address how brain pathology develops in aged and Alzheimer’s disease subjects. The lab’s main focus is to determine what causes tau proteins to accumulate in the brain. It...

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Jason Hinman

Jason Hinman

Assistant Professor, The Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles


Development of a Novel Mouse Model of Mixed Vascular- and Alzheimer’s -Caused Dementia The two leading causes of dementia are Alzheimer’s disease and white matter stroke. Clinical and autopsy studies suggest that 50 percent of dementia patients have features of both Alzheimer’s diseases and white matter stroke. Despite this clinical overlap,...

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Manu Sharma

Manu Sharma

Assistant Professor of Neuroscience, Weill Cornell Medicine


Tau Proteostasis by Hsc70 Co-Chaperones Microtubules are tiny tubular structures in cells that act like conveyor belts, moving vesicles, granules, chromosomes, and organelles such as mitochondria via special attachment proteins. Tau protein molecules stabilize these microtubules. But when tau proteins become defective, pathologies of the nervous system (such as Alzheimer’s disease) can develop....

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Marc Vermulst

Marc Vermulst

Assistant Professor, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia


Transcription errors in Alzheimer’s disease Transcription is required for every biological process inside a cell. Although most transcripts are generated faithfully from their DNA template, errors do occur from time to time. How these errors affect cellular function is unknown. To answer this question, Dr. Vermulst and his group monitored yeast cells that were...

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Alon Zaslaver

Alon Zaslaver

Senior Lecturer, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem


Synaptic failure in AD during aging-associated proteostasis collapse It is well known that aging and Alzheimer disease are intertwined processes. Moreover, during aging, cell control over its proteins deteriorates (termed proteostasis collapse), possibly augmenting Alzheimer’s disease progression. Thus aging, Alzheimer’s disease, and proteostasis collapse form an intricate threesome problem in neural...

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