News
News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Grantee in the News: NY Times spotlights Anne Brunet’s New Animal Model for Aging Research

Feb 27
2015

Grantee in the News: NY Times spotlights Anne Brunet’s New Animal Model for Aging Research

On February 27, 2015, The New York Times reported on the unique animal model for studying aging used by 2005 AFAR Research Grant Recipient Anne Brunet, Ph.D. Dr. Brunet chose to use the turquoise killifish as a model for studying that aging process because of their status as the one of the shortest lived vertebrates. Turquoise killifish are an idea research model because they are conducive for short duration studies while still sharing more overlaps with the human aging process than other short lived animals such as worms.  Anne Brunet, Ph.D., is a Professor of Genetics at Stanford University. …


View MoreREAD MORE


AFAR in the News: Seven AFAR Experts Featured in TIME’s special Longevity issue

Feb 23
2015

AFAR in the News: Seven AFAR Experts Featured in TIME’s special Longevity issue

Seven AFAR experts are featured in several articles TIME Magazine’s February 23 issue focusing on longevity. Covering the latest scientific discoveries in the field of aging research the story “Aging Disrupters - A Drug from Dirt and some Siamese Mice Have Researchers Inching Towards the Seemingly Impossible: A Cure for Aging” cites 2000 Research Grant Recipient, David Sinclair, Ph.D.; 1985 Research Grant Recipient Richard Miller, M.D., Ph.D.; 1993 Research Grant Recipient, Felipe Sierra, Ph.D.; and two-time Grantee Dena Dubal, M.D., Ph.D. AFAR’s Scientific Director Steven Austad is a featured “Longevity Guru…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News: Simon Johnson’s research wins Science & Sci Lab Prize for Young Scientists

Feb 20
2015

Grantee in the News: Simon Johnson’s research wins Science & Sci Lab Prize for Young Scientists

In February 2015, 2014  Glenn/AFAR Postdoctoral Fellow Simon Johnson was named the winner of the Translational Medicine category of the Science and SciLife Lab Prize for Young Scientists.  As part of the award, Dr. Johnson will receive a $3000 cash prize and have his research published in the online edition of Science. Dr. Johnson, whose research is focused around the biology of aging, was recognized for his work using the drug rapamycin to mimic the effects of calorie restriction for individuals suffering from mitochondrial related disease. Simon Johnson, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral researcher in genetics at Albert Einstein…


View MoreREAD MORE


AFAR Experts in the News: Seven AFAR Experts Weigh In on Potential of an Age-Delaying Drug

Feb 12
2015

AFAR Experts in the News: Seven AFAR Experts Weigh In on Potential of an Age-Delaying Drug

On February 12, 2015, Bloomberg News published an in-depth look at rapamycin, an FDA approved drug that experts now believe may work to delay the onset of the aging process.  The article cites seven AFAR affiliated experts: Deputy Scientific Director and three-time Grantee Nir Barzilai, M.D.; two-time Grantee Matt Kaeberlein, Ph.D.; two-time Grantee Brian Kennedy, Ph.D.; 1998 AFAR Award Recipient Valter Longo, Ph.D.; Board Member S. Jay Olshansky, Ph.D.; two-time Grantee Daniel Promislow, Ph.D.; and 2000 AFAR Research Grant Recipient David Sinclair, Ph.D.. Rapamycin has been approved to use against certain kidney, lung, and breast cancers.…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News: Lauren Ferrante Studies Disability Rates after the ICU

Feb 9
2015

Grantee in the News: Lauren Ferrante Studies Disability Rates after the ICU

In a new study, 2013 COE Fellow, Lauren Ferrante, MD, found that one half of older adult experience increased levels of disability or even death within one year of leaving the ICU. Dr. Ferrante’s research was published in the February 9th, 2015 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine.  A summary of the research can be found here. For more information about relationship between disability and old age read our “Ask the Expert” Q&A on frailty here. Lauren Ferrante, MD, is a Clinical Medical Fellow at Yale University.


View MoreREAD MORE




BACK TO TOPBACK TO TOP