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The latest updates from AFAR.

Grantee Spotlight Interview: Rozalyn Anderson, PhD

Jan 12
2017

Grantee Spotlight Interview: Rozalyn Anderson, PhD

  As we enter a new year, AFAR is proud to introduce its 2016 Biology of Aging grantees through Grantee Spotlight Interviews. Here, 2016 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award winner Rozalyn Anderson, PhD, shares what inspired her to enter the field of aging research and what impact she hopes her research will make thanks to AFAR’s support. Read Dr. Anderson's Grantee Spotlight Interview here:


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Grantee in the News:  latest research by Thomas Perls on Biomarkers on Aging in Aging Cell journal

Jan 9
2017

Grantee in the News: latest research by Thomas Perls on Biomarkers on Aging in Aging Cell journal

On January 6, 2017, Anatomical Society’s open access journal, Aging Cell, published new research co-authored by 1998 Beeson Scholar Thomas Perls, MD, MPA, FACP, on biomarkers as indicators or predictors of aging. In “Biomarker signatures of aging,” Perls and his co-authors posed: Because people age differently, age is not a sufficient marker of susceptibility to disabilities, morbidities, and mortality. We measured nineteen blood biomarkers that include constituents of standard hematological measures, lipid biomarkers, and markers of inflammation and frailty in 4704 participants of the Long Life Family Study (LLFS), age range 30–110 years, and used an agglomerative algorithm…


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Grantees in the News: Campisi, Kaeberlein, and Sinclair on The Telomere Effect

Jan 6
2017

Grantees in the News: Campisi, Kaeberlein, and Sinclair on The Telomere Effect

In the popular scientific publications STAT News and Scientific American, several AFAR-affiliated experts have lent insights on the publication of the recently published book, The Telomere Effect. On January 3, 2017, AFAR board member and 2000 AFAR Research Grant awardee David Sinclair, PhD and 1990 AFAR Research Grant winner Judi Campisi, PhD lent expert commentary to a STAT News feature: The book argues that “you can actually lengthen your telomeres — and perhaps your life — by following sound health advice, the authors argue, based on a review of thousands of studies.” Sinclair comments:  “I think it&rsquo…


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Grantee in the News: Stephen Helfand on RNA pathways and Longevity

Jan 5
2017

Grantee in the News: Stephen Helfand on RNA pathways and Longevity

On December 21, 2016, Nature Communications published research co-authored by 2014 Glenn/AFAR Breakthroughs in Gerontology (BIG) Award grantee, Stephen Helfand, MD, which shows the major role that an RNA pathway plays in longevity, based studying Drosphilia flies. In A somatic piRNA pathway in the Drosophila fat body ensures metabolic homeostasis and normal lifespan, Helfand and his co-authors are “the first to show that the anti-TE activity of the piRNA pathway also operates in a normal non-reproductive body tissue, the fly fat body, and that it helps to sustain the life of the animal,” as reported in News Medical. Read…


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Grantee in the News: Anthony Rosen's research on Sensitizing Radiologists on Signs of Elder Abuse

Jan 4
2017

Grantee in the News: Anthony Rosen's research on Sensitizing Radiologists on Signs of Elder Abuse

The December 2016 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) featured new research co-authored by 2007 MSTAR scholar and 2016 Beeson Scholar Anthony Rosen, MD. In “Radiologists' Training, Experience, and Attitudes About Elder Abuse Detection,” Rosen and his co-authors explore how radiologists can be better trained to detect signs of detect elder abuse. The study was picked up in a related article on PsychCentral.com, where Rosen notes: “Radiologists are a core part of the medical team in child abuse cases, so why shouldn’t they be a core part of the team in elder abuse?” Rosen…


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