News
News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Grantee in the News: S. Duke Han’s  Research on Grey Matter and Scams in Brain Imaging and Behavior Journal

Jul 2
2015

Grantee in the News: S. Duke Han’s Research on Grey Matter and Scams in Brain Imaging and Behavior Journal

2012 Beeson Scholar, Dr. S. Duke Han is the lead author on a research article published in the June 2015 issue of Brain Imaging and Behavior. The article, “Grey matter correlates of susceptibility to scams in community-dwelling older adults,” suggests that an inverse correlation exist between the amount of grey matter concentrated in certain areas of the brain and older adult’s susceptibility to scams. Dr. Han found that decreased levels of grey matter, an essential component of the central nervous system, resulted in older adults being more likely to fall for scams even when education, gender, and cognitive…


View MoreREAD MORE


AFAR in the News: Board Member Norman Relkin Shares Tips on Brain Health

Jun 30
2015

AFAR in the News: Board Member Norman Relkin Shares Tips on Brain Health

On June 30th, 2015 publications including HealthDay and WebMD featured comments from Board Member Dr. Norman Relkin on the importance of maintaining an active and health life style in order to maximize brain health. Dr. Relkin discusses how healthier living increases the amount of “brain reserve” or the ability of the brain to weather various changes such as aging.  He states, “The more brain reserve a person brings to the table, the older they can get without showing signs and symptoms of memory loss.” Norman Relkin, MD, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Clinical…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantee in the News: Troy Ghashghaei Studies Function of the MARCKS Protein

Jun 30
2015

Grantee in the News: Troy Ghashghaei Studies Function of the MARCKS Protein

On May 25, 2015, the journal Aging Cell published new research from 2010 AFAR Research Grant Recipient Troy Ghashghaei on the function of the MARCKS protein. MARCKS is found in the brain and helps to maintain the function of the ependymal cells, or the cells which form a protective barrier around the brain.  Dr. Ghashghei’s team found that when MARCKS was removed from ependymal cells oxidative stress increased and the brain aged rapidly.  This research shows that MARCKS may play an essential role in the speed of brain aging. Read the complete paper here or see a…


View MoreREAD MORE


Grantees in the News: Beeson Scholars Comment on the Improvement of Coronary Care in NY Times

Jun 25
2015

Grantees in the News: Beeson Scholars Comment on the Improvement of Coronary Care in NY Times

On June 19, 2015, The New York Times spotlighted the remarkable 38% decline in the death rate from coronary heart disease between 2003 and 2013, and featured commentary by 1996 Beeson Scholar Harlan Krumholz, MD and 1998 Beeson Eric Peterson, MD, MPH. Improvements in medical treatments, drugs, and procedures have all resulted in the steep decease in the death rate.  Dr. Peterson comments, “Heart disease mortality is dropping like a stone. This is a reason why.” The improvements in care have resulted in universal improvements at both small and large medical centers across the country.  Research from Dr. Krumholz has also found that…


View MoreREAD MORE


AFAR in the News: AFAR leadership in Nature piece on the clinical trial potential of drugs targeting age-related diseases

Jun 22
2015

AFAR in the News: AFAR leadership in Nature piece on the clinical trial potential of drugs targeting age-related diseases

On June 17, 2015, Nature journal spotlighted the Targeting Aging with Metformin (TAME) Trial  spearheaded by AFAR Deputy Scientific Director Dr. Nir Barzilai and explored its larger implications for aging research. On June 24th, Dr. Barzilai will lead a group meeting to engage the FDA in a discussion about recognizing aging as an indication that is appropriate for clinical trials. If successful, the TAME Trial could prove that a drug targeting aging can be an effective method of delaying the onset of aging-related diseases, including cancer, heart disease, and cognitive impairment. As AFAR’s executive director, Stephanie Lederman, notes in…


View MoreREAD MORE




BACK TO TOPBACK TO TOP