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News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Grantee in the News: Ai-Ling Lin Explores Caloric Restriction’s Effect on Brain Function

Jul 31
2014

Grantee in the News: Ai-Ling Lin Explores Caloric Restriction’s Effect on Brain Function

On July 2, 2014, the Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism released a study authored by a team including, 2012 AFAR Research Grant recipient Ai-Ling Lin, P.h.D.  Dr. Lin’s research on the effects of caloric restriction on age-related decline in brain function, was funded, in part, through her AFAR Award. Mitochondrial function declines have been proposed to be a major factor in the loss of age-related brain function.  By comparing rates of neuronal glucose oxidation and glutamate in young rats, control group old rats, and old Caloric Restricted rats, Dr. Lin and her team found…


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InfoAging Webinar | Muscles & Moves: The Science of Aging & Exercise

Jul 9
2014

InfoAging Webinar | Muscles & Moves: The Science of Aging & Exercise

  Tuesday July 29, 3-4pm, EST Register here by July 23 to secure your spot. For more information about the program and featured experts visit the event page here.  


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Grantee in the News: Inna Slutsky’s Team discovers new Alzheimer’s connections

Jul 2
2014

Grantee in the News: Inna Slutsky’s Team discovers new Alzheimer’s connections

On July 1, 2014 The Times of Israel reported on 2008 New Investigator Award in Alzheimer’s Disease recipient Inna Slutsky, PhD’s, new research uncovering one of the main reasons for the seizures, memory loss and cognitive impairment suffered by Alzheimer’s patients. Dr. Slutsky’s team uncovered a molecular mechanism behind hyperactivity in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients.  Accelerated binding of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and amyloid-beta triggers a “signaling cascade” in which messages shared by brain cells are amplified, elevating neuronal activity and essentially “short-circuiting” the brain…


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Grantee in the News: Thomas Perls Reveals Older Mom’s May Have Genes for Longevity

Jun 26
2014

Grantee in the News: Thomas Perls Reveals Older Mom’s May Have Genes for Longevity

On June 25, 2014, the Washington Post reported on a data analysis, performed by 1998 Paul Beeson Career Development Awards in Aging Research Scholar Thomas Perls, which found that the genes that allow some women to naturally have children later in life may also be linked to longevity. By examining the medical records of 462 women who took part in the Long Life Family Study, Dr. Perls found women who had their last child after 33 had twice the odds of living to 95 than women who stopped having children after 29. Thomas Perls, MD, MPA, is a Professor of Geriatrics at Boston University School…


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Grantee in the News: Sean Curran Finds Genetic Condition the Affects Worms Response to Diet

Jun 20
2014

Grantee in the News: Sean Curran Finds Genetic Condition the Affects Worms Response to Diet

On June 1, 2014, The Scientist highlighted new research from 2009 Glenn/AFAR Research in the Biology of Aging and 2013 AFAR Research Grant Awardee, Sean Curran, PhD, on the effect of diet on the lifespan of mutant C. elegans worms. Dr. Curran and his partner found that mutant worms with dysfunctional alh-6, which encodes a mitochondrial enzyme that converts P5C to glutamate, processed some diets more efficiently than others.  The researchers uncovered that mutant worms that experienced shorted longevity with an OP5O diet, lived normal lifespans on a HT115 E.coli diet. By illustrating how gene&rsquo…


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