News
News

The latest updates from AFAR.

Grantee in the News: Adam Gazzaley on Brain-Training Research

Jun 28
2016

Grantee in the News: Adam Gazzaley on Brain-Training Research

On June 20th, US World Reports/Health Day featured insights from two-time AFAR grantee, Adam Gazzaley, MD, PhD. Dr. Gazzlaey commented on recently published research that some of the brain-boosting claims posed by commercial brain-training programs may be enhanced by a placebo effect.  Recent research found that when people are told they are participating in a brain-boosting study, they perform 5-10 points better on follow-up IQ tests than the control group.  While this research does not prove there is no benefit from brain training programs, the study’s authors are critical that the scientific evidence sited…


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Board Member in the News: Michael Hodin on the WHO Health and Ageing Strategy for Huff/Post 50

Jun 21
2016

Board Member in the News: Michael Hodin on the WHO Health and Ageing Strategy for Huff/Post 50

In his latest Huffington Post  blog post, AFAR Board Member and CEO of the Global Coalition on Aging, Michael Hodin, PhD, commended on the World Health Organization’s recently passed strategy on Health and Ageing. This May, the 69th World Health Assembly passed a comprehensive strategy focused around a worldwide goal of healthier and more active aging by enabling “functional ability” in our later decades.  The strategy includes an execution plan for all 194 member countries to work toward a decade of healthy aging in 2020. Highlights of the plan include: • committing to action on Healthy…


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2016 Scientific Conferences

Jun 21
2016

2016 Scientific Conferences

From June 5 through 8, AFAR convened three scientific meetings in Santa Barbara, California. Nearly 100 attendees-- including AFAR grantees, senior leaders the field, and representatives from foundations--assembled to report on their AFAR-supported research, and senior investigators from top institutions nationwide shared insights on emerging directions in the field. First, AFAR hosted the New Investigators In Alzheimer’s Disease Grantee Meeting, sponsored by The Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Foundation. Grantees from 2007 to the present shared their current research through in 5 minute “Data Blitz” presentations. AFAR’s Director of Programs, Odette van der Willik and 2015 New Investigator Jason Hinman, MD,…


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Ten AFAR experts featured in special Aging issue of Cell Metabolism

Jun 17
2016

Ten AFAR experts featured in special Aging issue of Cell Metabolism

June 14, 2016, the respected, peer reviewed journal Cell Metabolism  launched their first-ever “Focus on Aging,” issue available for free. AFAR is proud that seven out of the issue’s ten articles were co-authored by a grantee or board member, including Scientific Director Steven N. Austad, PhD, and Deputy Scientific Director Nir Barzilai, MD. AFAR applauds the journal’s attention to the relationship between cell metabolism and the biology of aging, and we congratulate the ten AFAR affiliated investigators whose research and insights were published: Sex Differences in Lifespan, co authored by Steven Austad, PhD, AFAR Scientific…


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Grantees in the News: Giulio Taglialatela and Joshua Shulman on enzyme’s role in degenerative brain disease

Jun 7
2016

Grantees in the News: Giulio Taglialatela and Joshua Shulman on enzyme’s role in degenerative brain disease

On June 2, 2016, PLOS Biology published new research co-authored by AFAR grantees Giulio Taglialatela, PhD (1994 AFAR Research Grant), and Joshua Shulman, MD, PhD (2014 New Investigator in Alzheimer’s Disease Award). The research explored a second function of the NMNAT2 enzyme, which may protect against degenerative brain diseases. The NMNAT2 is well known for its function producing nicotine adenine dinucleotide, NAD, which helps to protect the brain against oxidative stress.  According to this new research, NMNAT2 also serves as molecular chaperon, by helping mis-folded proteins refold properly. The build-up of mis-folded protein has been associated with numerous cognitive diseases,…


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