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The latest updates from AFAR.

AFAR in the News: Wall Street Journal article spotlights AFAR-supported “TAME” study

Mar 17
2015

AFAR in the News: Wall Street Journal article spotlights AFAR-supported “TAME” study

On March 17, 2015, AFAR and several of our experts were  featured in a Wall Street Journal article, “To Grow Old Without Disease.” Prominently featured on the cover of the Personal Journal section, the article examines the Targeting Aging with Metformin or “TAME” trial, which AFAR has helped plan and fund, and cites project leader and AFAR Deputy Scientific Director, Dr. Nir Barzilai as well as AFAR Board Members Dr. James Kirkland and Dr. S. Jay Olshansky. The goal of the project is to implement a clinical study testing metformin, an FDA approved drug that researchers’…


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Board Member in the News: Medical Officer Richard Besdine’s latest Column explores Elder Abuse

Mar 17
2015

Board Member in the News: Medical Officer Richard Besdine’s latest Column explores Elder Abuse

In his latest Huffington Post blog, AFAR Medical Officer Richard W. Besdine, M.D., draws attention to the relationship between elder abuse and health, particularly as a concern for geriatric professionals and personal caregivers. Defining elder abuse as “the physical, psychological or sexual harm, neglect (self-neglect or by a caregiver) or financial exploitation of vulnerable older people,”  Dr. Besdine states “that elder abuse has devastating and far-reaching health consequences, and triples the risk of premature death, compared to a group of older adults with similar medical problems…” The article also includes insights from Board…


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Grantee in the News: Changiz Geula finds Alzheimer’s Related Brain Plaque Build-Up in Young Adults

Mar 4
2015

Grantee in the News: Changiz Geula finds Alzheimer’s Related Brain Plaque Build-Up in Young Adults

On March 4, 2015 CBSNews.com reported on 2009 AFAR Research Grant recipient Changiz Geula, Ph.D’s research finding amyloid plaque build-up, a symptom often associated in Alzheimer’s disease, in the brains of individuals as young as 20. According to Dr. Geula, “The implication appears to be that if we want to prevent these clumps from forming when a person becomes old, we may need to intervene much earlier than we have thought, to try and get rid of amyloid very early in life.” Read the full CBSNews.com story here. Dr. Changiz Geula is a…


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Grantee in the News: NY Times spotlights Anne Brunet’s New Animal Model for Aging Research

Feb 27
2015

Grantee in the News: NY Times spotlights Anne Brunet’s New Animal Model for Aging Research

On February 27, 2015, The New York Times reported on the unique animal model for studying aging used by 2005 AFAR Research Grant Recipient Anne Brunet, Ph.D. Dr. Brunet chose to use the turquoise killifish as a model for studying that aging process because of their status as the one of the shortest lived vertebrates. Turquoise killifish are an idea research model because they are conducive for short duration studies while still sharing more overlaps with the human aging process than other short lived animals such as worms.  Anne Brunet, Ph.D., is a Professor of Genetics at Stanford University. …


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AFAR in the News: Seven AFAR Experts Featured in TIME’s special Longevity issue

Feb 23
2015

AFAR in the News: Seven AFAR Experts Featured in TIME’s special Longevity issue

Seven AFAR experts are featured in several articles TIME Magazine’s February 23 issue focusing on longevity. Covering the latest scientific discoveries in the field of aging research the story “Aging Disrupters - A Drug from Dirt and some Siamese Mice Have Researchers Inching Towards the Seemingly Impossible: A Cure for Aging” cites 2000 Research Grant Recipient, David Sinclair, Ph.D.; 1985 Research Grant Recipient Richard Miller, M.D., Ph.D.; 1993 Research Grant Recipient, Felipe Sierra, Ph.D.; and two-time Grantee Dena Dubal, M.D., Ph.D. AFAR’s Scientific Director Steven Austad is a featured “Longevity Guru…


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