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The latest updates from AFAR.

Grantee in the News: Dena Dubal Finds Correlation between Brain Size and Longevity Gene Variant

Jan 29
2015

Grantee in the News: Dena Dubal Finds Correlation between Brain Size and Longevity Gene Variant

On January 27, 2015, the journal Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology released new research from two-time AFAR grantee Dena Dubal, MD, PhD, connecting a gene previously shown to be related to longevity to increased size of a key brain region. Dr. Dubal’s research found that individuals with a single copy of the gene KLOTHO exhibited larger right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (rDLPFC) regions than those who either lacked the gene or have more than one copy.  Both KLOTHO and larger rDLPFC regions have been associated with better performance on cognitive tests in middle aged and older adults.  Dr.…


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Grantee in the News: Judith Campisi Received Prestigious International Award

Jan 26
2015

Grantee in the News: Judith Campisi Received Prestigious International Award

Dr. Judith Campisi On January 22, 2015, 1990 AFAR Research Award grantee Judith Campisi was named the recipient of Norway’s Olav Thon Foundation’s first international research award in the medical and natural sciences. Dr. Campisi was recognized for her pioneering work on the connection between aging and cancer and the process of cellular senescence, which is linked to chronic inflammation.  The $660,000 award will be presented to Dr. Campisi and her co-recipient on March 5th, 2015. Judith Campisi, PhD is a Professor at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging. For more on Dr. Campisi’s research…


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Board Member Emeriti in the News: John Rowe Quoted in the Wall Street Journal

Jan 26
2015

Board Member Emeriti in the News: John Rowe Quoted in the Wall Street Journal

Citing former Board President Dr. John Rowe as an authority, on January 21, 2015, the Wall Street Journal Blog posted an article on lifestyle choices that affect longevity. The article stated that lifestyle choices are much more important than genetics when it comes to determining healthspan.  According to Dr. Rowe “only about 30% of the characteristics of aging are genetically based; the rest – 70% are not.”  For lifestyle tips that encourage health aging read the full blog post here or visit the Healthy Aging portal on InfoAging.org for expertly vetted information. Dr. John Rowe is…


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Grantees in the News: Beeson Scholars Collaborate on Study on Diabetes in Older Adults

Jan 14
2015

Grantees in the News: Beeson Scholars Collaborate on Study on Diabetes in Older Adults

On January 12, 2015, Jama Internal Medical Journal published a research study entitled “Potential Overtreatment of Diabetes Mellitus in Older Adults With Tight Glycemic Control,” co-authored by four Paul Beeson Career Development Awards in Aging Research Program Scholars: Kasia Lipska, MD, MHS (2014); Joseph Ross, MD, MHA (2008); Sei Lee, MD, MAS (2011); Michael Steinman, MD (2008).  The AFAR funded researchers found that many older adults were likely over treated for diabetes.  Read the complete study here. A related Opinion Piece, "When Diabetes Treatment Goes Too Far," by Dr. Lipska also appaered on January 12  in The New York Times. Read the…


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Grantee in the News: Katrin Andreasson Alzheimer’s Research on Brain’s Immune Cells in the Media

Jan 9
2015

Grantee in the News: Katrin Andreasson Alzheimer’s Research on Brain’s Immune Cells in the Media

On January 9th, 2015, CBS News referenced findings from 1998 AFAR Research Grant Recipient and 2001 Beeson Scholar Katrin Andreasson, MD’s recent study at Stanford University, originally published online in the December 8,  2014 issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation. Dr. Andreasson’s research has focused on the relationship between the loss of functionary of microglia cells and the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Read the full summary here. Dr. Katrin Andreasson is a Professor of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center. AFAR has long-been dedicated to supporting Alzheimer’s research. Learn more about…


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